Ezra Houghton Curtis, 1822

Screen shot 2013-12-22 at 9.44.34 PMEssential Information

Born: 19 Feb 1822 Rutland, Tioga, PA
Married: 18 Dec 1846 Lucinda Carter Mt. Pisgah, Iowa
Died: 28 Aug 1915 Aurora, Sevier, Utah
Temple Ordinances Performed:
Temple Ordinances Needed:
Father: Enos Curtis
Mother: Ruth Franklin
Children: Ezra H. Curtis

It appears that Ezra Houghton Arrived in Salt Lake in 1848

Birth: Feb. 19, 1823
Death: Aug. 28, 1915

From http://mikeandrhondafamilyhistory.blogspot.com/:

Ezra Houghton Curtis was born on 19 February 1823 in Rutland, Tiago County, Pennsylvania. He died 28 August 1915 in Aurora, Sevier, Utah.
His first marriage was on 18 December 1846 in Mount Pisgah, Iowa to Lucinda Carter, who was born 14 January 1831 in Oxford, Maine. She died on 26 January 1904 in Aurora and was the daughter of Dominicus Carter and Lydia Smith. They had two children born in Council Bluffs, Iowa, then came to Utah in 1851.

They settled in Provo where they lived until 1875 when Ezra and his sons moved to Aurora [Willow Bend]. This family, George and Alma Holdaway were first settlers in Aurora. They cleared and planted land, made the first irrigation system. These early days were very difficult, but they opened the valley and soon others came. More land planted and buildings were erected.
In 1877, Ezra’s father, Enos, and some of his brothers came from Springville and permanent homes were established. The twelve children of this first marriage were born in Iowa, Provo, and in Cedar City.

http://mikeandrhondafamilyhistory.blogspot.com/2010/06/ezra-houghton-curtis-brief-history.html#more

Ezra Houghton Curtis was born on 19 February 1823 in Rutland, Tiago County, Pennsylvania. He died 28 August 1915 in Aurora, Sevier, Utah.

His first marriage was on 18 December 1846 in Mount Pisgah, Iowa to Lucinda Carter, who was born 14 January 1831 in Oxford, Maine. She died on 26 January 1904 in Aurora and was the daughter of Dominicus Carter and Lydia Smith. They had two children born in Council Bluffs, Iowa, then came to Utah in 1851.

They settled in Provo where they lived until 1875 when Ezra and his sons moved to Aurora [Willow Bend]. This family, George and Alma Holdaway were first settlers in Aurora. They cleared and planted land, made the first irrigation system. These early days were very difficult, but they opened the valley and soon others came. More land planted and buildings were erected.

In 1877, Ezra’s father, Enos, and some of his brothers came from Springville and permanent homes were established. The twelve children of this first marriage were born in Iowa, Provo, and in Cedar City.

The following excerpt is from OUR BOOK OF REMEMBRANCE, on the site: http://mikeandrhondafamilyhistory.blogspot.com/2010/06/ezra-houghton-curtis-brief-history.html :

Ezra Houghton Curtis brief history
Ezra Houghton Curtis was born on 19 February 1823 in Rutland, Tiago County, Pennsylvania. He died 28 August 1915 in Aurora, Sevier, Utah.
His first marriage was on 18 December 1846 in Mount Pisgah, Iowa to Lucinda Carter, who was born 14 January 1831 in Oxford, Maine. She died on 26 January 1904 in Aurora and was the daughter of Dominicus Carter and Lydia Smith. They had two children born in Council Bluffs, Iowa, then came to Utah in 1851.

They settled in Provo where they lived until 1875 when Ezra and his sons moved to Aurora

Ezra Houghton Curtis Home

Call Number
MSS P-1 # 13363
Title
Ezra Curtis, Sr. [and Ruby]
Photographer
Anderson, George Edward, 1860-1928
Description
A photograph, taken outdoors, of a house with two porches and one window that is high up. In front of the house are a few short trees, two stacks of lumber, a dog, three horses with a man holding their reins, and a woman.
Edition
Electronic reproduction;
Date Original
ca. 1880-1920
Publisher Digital
L. Tom Perry Special Collections, Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University
Date Digital
2005-12
Contractor
Curtis, Ezra Sr.
Physical Description
Gelatin dry plate negative; 17.2 x 20.32 cm. (5 x 8 in.)
Dimensions
17.2 x 20.32 cm. (5 x 8 in.)
Medium
Gelatin dry plate negative
Owning Institution
Brigham Young University
Genre
Photographs
Portraits
Double portraits
Subject
Men–Portraits
Women–Portraits
Dwellings–Utah
Curtis family–Photographs
Topics
Men–Portraits
Women–Portraits
Dwellings–Utah
Curtis family–Photographs
Collection
George Edward Anderson Photograph Collection
Patron Usage Instructions
http://www.lib.byu.edu/sc_copyright.html

[Willow Bend]. This family, George and Alma Holdaway were first settlers in Aurora. They cleared and planted land, madethe first irrigation system. These early days were very difficult, but they opened the valley and soon others came. More land planted and buildings were erected.
In 1877, Ezra’s father, Enos, and some of his brothers came from Springville and permanent homes were established. The twelve children of this first marriage were born in Iowa, Provo, and in Cedar City.

Ezra Houghton Curtis 2

From Settlement of Aurora:

Settlement of Aurora
in Utah Historical Markers
Posted by: Groundspeak Premium Member JAC0B
N 38° 55.168 W 111° 56.030
12S E 419045 N 4308254
Quick Description: While riding through the Aurora valley, George T. Holdaway, J. Alma Holdaway and Elliott Newell of Provo, Utah, noticed fertile soil and an abundance of water and decided to begin a settlement here.
Location: Utah, United States
Date Posted: 11/30/2007 9:06:13 AM
Waymark Code: WM2P9N
Published By: Groundspeak Premium Member Team GeoDuo
Views: 31
Download this waymark:
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Long Description:
While riding through the Aurora valley, George T. Holdaway, J. Alma Holdaway and Elliott Newell of Provo, Utah, noticed fertile soil and an abundance of water and decided to begin a settlement here.
They traveled home and encouraged others to join them. On March 25, 1875, they returned with Franklin Hill, Ezra H. Curtis, his sons, and wife, Julia. Julia, the only woman in the area for six months, lived in a wagon box until a log cabin was built for her. Soon others came to build homes and farm the land. They named their community “Willow Bend.”

In 1879 the settlers bought a small canal that had been dug by Dr. Coons and Sons. It was enlarged, providing more water for their crops. Later, two more canals were dug. The gave the valley a good water supply and fulfilled a prophecy that the valley would be farmed from mountain to mountain. Drinking water from the river and canals caused many to develop typhoid fever, so all water was boiled until wells could be dug.

In 1879 a one-room log schoolhouse was built and used for both church and community activities. Maggie Keller was the first school teacher. Ernest Shepherd opened the first store in one room of his house. He played his violin for dances. Sidney Curtis and Andrew Anderson often played their accordians. A co-op was built in 1884. Another store, owned by John Larsen, was bought by C.C. Christensen and moved into town; it later became the post office.

When the community applied to the government for a post office the name “WIllow Bend” was changed, Numan Van Louvan, the first postmaster, suggested the name Aurora, after the Northern Lights.
Marker Name: Settlement of Aurora

Marker Type: City

County: Sevier

City: Aurora

Group Responsible for Placement: Daughters of Utah Pioneers

Date Dedicated: 2005

Marker Number: 536

Addtional Information: Not listed

Web link(s) for additional information: Not listed
SOURCE: Settlement of Aurora – Utah Historical Markers on Waymarking.com – http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM2P9N_Settlement_of_Aurora
Deseret Iron Company Account Book (UT)
Page 370; Deseret Iron Company Account Book, 1854-1867

http://www.footnote.com/document/241906166/

Iron workers and others associated with the ill-fated iron works at what is now Cedar City, Utah, were paid on account, due to a shortage of currency in the frontier community. These ledgers list the names and occupations of the workers and the amounts credited for their services. As with many mining communities of the day, items they needed from the company store were then debited from their accounts. The mission ultimately failed due to poor weather, hostile Indians, and unforeseen manufacturing problems.
From the History of George Timothy Holdaway:
George Timothy Holdaway was born Dec. 4, 1854 in Provo, Utah… When he was just a young man, he and his brother Joseph Alma and Elliot Newell got on their horses and started out to see the country. They went about 100 miles south into Sevier Co where they saw what they thought would be a good place to farm. Returning to Provo they stopped in Springville at the ho,e of Jabez Durfee and told him of the fertile farm land they had found.
In Provo they gathered what teams and cattle they could and started out for Willow Bend on the Sevier River. They had three covered wagons drawn by ox teams and it took nine days to make the trip. They took with them some young stock, plows and scrappers and made their harrows out of wood.
The first thing they did was to build a canal, clear the land and plant a crop, so anxious were they that they stayed thru all night to watch the water. However, the crop was a failure that first year, so they returned to Provo. On the way back, they stopped at Jabez Durfee’s home and here young George met Deseret Almira, daughter of Jabez.
The next spring, George Holdaway, Ezra Curtis and his three sons, Jabez Durfee and some others returned to Willow Bend. It was while building the Rocky Ford Canal that so many travellers tried to discourage them. One traveller offered them twenty dollars for the first bushel of wheat they could raise. George Holdaway spoke up and said to Ezra Curtis, “Let us go to work; if we listen to what ever fool has to say we will never get anything done”.
To make the first dam that stayed in the Sevier River, they pinned three logs together with wood pins, called a brent and fastened them in the river. George Holdaway stood in the water up to his shoulders and pushed the brent into place, while Jabez held him by the hair to keep him from going down stream. However, the land was so full of clods that they could not water it. So Jabez Durfee made a wooden roller with two plows on it with which they crushed the clods and made furrows.
In the fall of 1877, Jabez Durfee’s wife and children came to spend the winter in Willow Bend. They had a fruit orchard in Springville so they brought with them apples and canned fruit for winter use.
The friendship between George Timothy Holdaway and Deseret Almira Durfee had grown and so in Dec. 25, 1877 they were married at Willow Bend by Bishop Ezra H. Curtis. They were very happy. Young George had homesteaded some land and they dreamed of a home and happiness.
When spring came Almira went back to Springville to await the birth of their child. While there, they had so many apples that she sold some to a traveling missionary for a Bible to keep her records in, which we are proud to have to this day. Young George spent the summer tending his land and building a log house for his family.
In September, 1878, he started for Springville, riding his horse three days, so he could be with his wife when their baby was born. She died just twenty minutes before he arrived, leaving a beautiful black-haired girl whom they named Deseret. She was born Sept. 29, 1878. He was broken hearted and after a few weeks returned to Willow Bend to take care of the land. He left his little baby with her grandparents, Jabez Durfee and his wife where she remained until she was thirteen years old when her grandmother died. She was loved by everyone and spent part of her time with her father.
On one of his trips to St. George, President Brigham Young and party were escorted by George Holdaway and William Crane with some other town people, from Salina to Richfield, Utah. En route President Young stopped and looking over the valley said, “Some of you here today will live to see this valley farmed from Mountain to Mountain”. George Holdaway and William Crane lived to see that day.
The winter of 1879, Laura Wipple came to Willow Bend to stay with her sister, Mayr Ann Curtis, and help with the children. It was then that George Holdaway met her and they became friends. When she returned home her father was planning on leaving for Mexico. Not wanting to go, she wrote to George Holdaway and told him if he would meet her in Juab, she would marry him. They met, but on their way back, she lost all her trousseau while crossing the Sevier River. They were married Oct 21, 1880 in the St. George Temple.
George and Laura were happy. They got rock from the nearby hills and built a two room home with an upstairs. They built a barn for their cattle and horses. Being fond of horses as he was, he had an outstanding team and liked fast trotters. Their first child was a boy born Oct. 25, 1881.
The first school house was built of split logs in 1879. It was located just east of the Rocky Ford Canal. It had only one room and was used for church and all amusements. The pupils sat on rough plank benches and the desks were made against the side of the walls. Maggie Keeler was the first teacher and she stayed at the Holdaway home. When they applied for a Post Office, the Government wouldn’t grant it under the name of Willow Bend, so Newman Vanlerwan’s name of Aurora was chosen, meaning “Northern Lights”.
George and Laura Wipple Holdaway were the parents of nine children, four boys and five girls. George was always working to make things better for his family. Drinking water was first secured from the canal of the river, but the water was so impure that many had typhoid fever. This made it necessary for them to boil the water until they could dig wells. George Holdaway tried five times to dig a well before he succeeded and this was the only well in town for several years. Everyone used it and it is in use today.
Early amusements consisted of rag bees, quilting, corn husking, dancing and house parties. The women would get together and work all day; then the men would join them and have supper and visit until the wee hours of the morning.
George and Laura liked to have company. When the Church Authorities came down for Conference they enjoyed taking them home to dinner. When Conference was in Richfield they would get up early, drive fourteen miles to attend the meetings, then return home and do the evening farm chores.
In 1887, diphtheria broke out causing all public gatherings to be closed for a period of time. George was a happy man when in 1914 he bought his first car, a Maxwell. It was the first car in Aurora. About this time they also bought a phonograph with records and many were the times when they would take out the carpets and have a dance.
About 1927 he bought a radio and the town people would go the the old rock house to hear it. It was a wonderful thing to hear the news and the singing and he especially enjoyed the “World Series” baseball.
George and Laura were always active in Church and civic affairs. When he was seventy-four years of age, he still lived on the land that he homesteaded; had a good team of black work horses, cultivated his land and milked his cows, but his health failed.
May 24, 1929, George Timothy Holdaway died at his home in Aurora, Utah. =
Written by his granddaughter, Ila Shepherd.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~janwest/f177.htm

Encyclopedic history:

“…Wm. Kearnes and Robert Gillespie (of Gunnison, Sanpete Co.), Anthony Robinson (of Monroe) and some others were killed by Indians near Salina, and in 1867 the place was temporarily vacated because of the Indian war. The place was resettled in 1871 and Bishop Peter Rasmussen, returning with the rest, again took charge of the settlement as its Bishop. He was succeeded in 1874 by Franklin Spencer, who in 1877 was made president of the newly organized Sevier Stake of Zion, and was succeeded as Bishop of Salina by Ezra H. Curtis, who was succeeded in 1879 by Rasmus Jensen, who later the same year was succeeded by Jens Jensen, who was succeeded in 1887 by James S. Jensen…”
Encyclopedic history of the Church of Jesus Christ of latter-day saints, pg. 738

Life of Ezra Curtis, by Janis M. Hardy (on Familysearch.org):

Ezra Houghton Curtis was born in Rutland, Tioga County, Pennsylvania, February 19, 1823. His father, Enos Curtis, joined the church about the time the Book of Mormon was first published. It is said of Enos Curtis that he accepted Joseph before the church was organized. Enos and his family lived in Tioga County, Pennsylvania, near Harmony, for a number of years and here had the opportunity to learn about Joseph Smith. Also, in later years, Enos was one of the five missionaries sent out by the church in 1831, who preached the gospel to Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball.

While Ezra was yet a small boy, he, with his family, went through persecutions and mobbings of the saints. The family was driven in various moves, first from Kirtland, Ohio, then on to Missouri and later to Illinois. Ezra was a young man twenty-one years of age living in Nauvoo when Prophet Joseph Smith was martyred. He heard the last speech of the Prophet given on the public square, and often told his family he heard the Prophet say, “I am going like a lamb to the slaughter; but am calm as a summer’s morning.” When the saints wept, the Prophet told them to “Cheer up for every tear you shed shall be veiled up and poured out in wrath upon our enemies.”

When the saints were expelled from Nauvoo, Ezra, with his father’s family, went to Mt. Pisgah, Iowa, where he found and later married Lucinda Carter. He and Lucinda thereafter went to Council Bluffs where they spent three or four years before going to Utah. They crossed the plains with the Joseph Horne Company. Fortunately, they had a good team of horses, perhaps the only one in the company. The others were driving mostly teams of oxen. Ezra hunted game along the way and supplied the company with meat. His wife drove the wagon most of the way to Utah. He and his father-in-law Dominicus Carter, did blacksmith repair work for the company. Brother Carter was an excellent blacksmith by trade and Ezra learned much from him.

When they reached Utah, Ezra and his wife settled in Provo along with his father-in-law Dominicus Carter, as some of the first settlers of Provo. In addition to taking care of his own needs, Ezra was frequently called upon to aid others in the great western migration. The handcart companies of 1856, for example, were overtaken by cold weather and the early snows of the winter before they reached their destination. They suffered greatly from hunger and fatigue. Ezra, with others, was called to go with his team and wagon to assist the rescue party and bring the suffering travelers to the valley. He also served as a scout during the Indian troubles in Utah, sometimes being away for several weeks at a time before returning home. At times the drum, the call to “the minute men,” would beat in the night, and the brethren would be required to leave their families, not knowing where they were going or when they would return.

Later, Ezra was called to go to what is now the southern part of the State of Utah to help settle that section of the country. He and his brothers-in-law were the first men to settle in what later became known as Cedar City. Next they moved to Sevier River Valley where they helped settle and develop the area for a future town site which later became the town of Aurora. Ezra built the first home there, a log dwelling. Here they took up land and began building a canal. As a result, a substantial farming community was developed.

Ezra and Lucinda spent the remainder of their lives in Aurora. Lucinda died January 26, 1904. Ezra passed away eleven year later on August 28, 1915, at the age of ninety-one years, but he was fairly active for his years. Even at that point of life, he managed to get around and do a few chores. He fed calves, chopped wood, pulled weeds and did a number of odd jobs.

Ezra lived a long and useful life as a member of an early convert family, a rugged pioneer, and experienced colonizer, and a worthy servant of the Lord. Here was a man who devoted himself in loyalty to the Church leaders and helped build the Kingdom in the great west.

Ezra Houghton Curtis was in the militia that attacked the innocent in the Mountain Meadows Massacre.

Ezra Houghton Curtis’s Involvement in the Mountain Meadows Massacre:

From the 1857 Iron County Militia Project:

Biographical Sketch of Ezra Houghton Curtis

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Ezra Curtis, his personal and family background, and his involvement in the Mountain Meadows Massacre.

Ezra Houghton Curtis (1823-1915)

Biographical Sketch

ezra_houghton_curtis_1.jpg Ezra Houghton Curtis was born in 1823 in western Pennsylvania to Enos Curtis and Ruth Franklin. He was the tenth of fourteen children. His father was an early convert to Mormonism and one of its earliest missionaries. In 1831, Enos Curtis had a role in the eventual conversion of future Mormon leaders Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball.

In 1835, 12-year-old Ezra Houghton was baptized a member of the Mormon Church. During the mid-1830s, the Curtis family lived in the Mormon settlements in western Missouri. In the difficulties known in Missouri history as the “Mormon Wars”, they and their fellow Mormons were expelled during the winter of 1838-39 and eventually relocated to the newly-founded Mormon settlements in western Illinois.

Following the assassination of Mormon founder Joseph Smith in 1844 and the continuing unrest between the original settlers of western Illinois and the Mormons, the Curtis family joined the Mormon hegira from western Illinois beyond the Mississippi River into the Iowa and Nebraska territories. In the early winter of 1846, 22-year-old Ezra Curtis married Lucinda Carter (1831-1904), who was nearly 16. A native of Maine, Lucinda was the daughter of Dominicus Carter and Lydia Smith. Their first two children were born in the Mormon settlements in western Iowa, near modern-day Council Bluffs. She would eventually bear him twelve children. In 1851, after accumulating sufficient means, the extended Curtis family joined a Mormon wagon company and immigrated to Utah Territory.

By the mid-1850s, Curtis and his wife and children had moved to southern Utah and settled in Cedar City.

For 1857, Curtis, 35, was listed in Iron County militia records as a 2nd Lieutenant in one of the militia platoons in Company E. Irishman Samuel Pollack was sergeant in the same platoon. The platoons in Company E were led by Captain Elias Morris, a Welch emigrant, and that company was attached to the 2nd Battalion under the leadership of Major Isaac C. Haight.

Multiple sources attest to Ezra Curtis’s presence at Mountain Meadows during the week of the massacre. Mormon herdsman Henry Higgins observed Curtis among the militia detachment departing Cedar City for the Meadows on the evening of Monday, September 7. John D. Lee mentioned Curtis as among those in the area on Thursday evening when the final militia council was held, the one that led to the deceptive ploy to trick the Arkansas company into abandoning their defensive wagon circle. Curtis’s exact role in the final massacre on Friday, September 11 is not known with certainty but it seems probable that he was among the Cedar City militiamen who accompanied the emigrant men away from the wagon circle in their northward line of march.

Curtis’s name is included in the 1859 arrest warrant issued by Judge John Cradlebaugh. In 1875, during the first trial of John D. Lee, Samuel Pollock identified Curtis as among those who mustered to Mountain Meadows early in the week. Lee also mentioned Curtis in his posthumously-published autobiography, Mormonism Unveiled.
ezra_houghton_curtis_2a.jpg
After the dual disasters of the massacre and the failure of the iron works in Cedar City, Curtis and his family joined the exodus from that troubled settlement. They moved north to Provo where he pursued farming. In 1875, they moved back to southern Utah to pioneer at Willow Bend, now Aurora, in the high broad valley drained by the Sevier River. It is not known whether this move from Provo to the more remote mountainous region in southern Utah was prompted by the indictment and prosecution of former Iron County militiamen for their complicity in the massacre or by other considerations.

Eventually, Curtis took a plural wife, Juliaette Everett, who bore him seven more children. His first wife, Lucinda, died in 1904. In 1915, Curtis died in Aurora, Sevier, Utah where he had lived for four decades. He was survived by his second wife and his many children.

References: Bishop, The History of Sevier County, 85; Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, 832; FamilySearch.org; Lee, Mormonism Unveiled; Lee Trial transcripts; Shirts and Shirts, A Trial Furnace: Southern Utah’s Iron Mission, 495; Walker, et al, Massacre at Mountain Meadows, Appendix C; Warnke, Biographical sketch of Ezra Houghton Curtis, 1823-1915.

Our thanks to John Warnke for further background on Ezra Curtis.

For more information on Ezra Houghton Curtis see:

* http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=9055559

Further information and confirmation needed.

Please comment below or contact editor@1857ironcountymilitia.com.
Thank you!

Richard E. Turley, in Massacre at Mountain Meadows, stated:

Appendix C: The Militiamen

The following is a list of men in the Iron Military District of Utah Territory’s Nauvoo Legion militia whose names have been associated with the Mountain Meadows Massacre. The names have been gathered from a variety of sources that include eyewitness accounts, arrest warrants, criminal indictments, and newspaper articles.

A completely accurate list of those who participated in or witnessed the murder of the California-bound emigrants may be impossible to compile. Many of the participants kept silent about their roles. The testimonies of many witnesses were given fifteen years or more after the massacre. Those who admitted being at the massacre were usually careful not to incriminate themselves and their closest associates.

The names are organized in alphabetical order. Each entry includes life span, as well as age, militia rank (where applicable), residence at the time of the massacre.1 Because of the varying credibility of evidence, a note of [A] or [B] has been placed after each individual’s name and age; [A] indicates there is strong evidence the individual planned, authorized, participated in, or witnessed the killing of emigrants, and [B] indicates that the evidence is inconclusive. Men whose names have been associated with the massacre have not been listed if there is little or no evidence to support that association.2

Curtis, Ezra Houghton (1822–1915), 35. [A] Second Lieutenant, Company E, First Platoon, Cedar City. Samuel Pollock said that Ezra Curtis ordered him to go to Mountain Meadows with a group that left Cedar City. Curtis was seen by John D. Lee at the Meadows with other militia officers before the massacre.17

17. Samuel Pollock, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, First Trial, Boreman Transcript 4:62, 5:180–81; Bishop, Mormonism Unveiled, 232, 379; Higgins, affidavit, April 20, 1859, printed in Utah and the Mormons, 42; Jabez Sutherland, United States v. John D. Lee, First Trial, Boreman Transcript 8:4. Judge John Cradlebaugh issued a warrant in 1859 for Ezra Curtis’s arrest. Utah and the Mormons, 20.

“The Mormon Massacre: Names of All the White Murderers,” New York Herald, May 22, 1877, also reprinted in “The Massacre: The Names of All the Whites Who Participated in It,” Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 30, 1877. The name “George Hanley” that appears in this newspaper list is likely a reference to George Hawley. Even though it said George was dead, he had actually just left Utah. Iowa, Shelby County, Grove Township, 1880 U.S. Census, population schedule, 8. This list, which claimed to be published posthumously from a handwritten note by John D. Lee, included several names that were not associated with other lists attributed to Lee, nor are the names verified from other sources. Those names, as listed in the article, are: J. [Jehiel] McConnel, “two men named Curtis,” J. [Jonathon] Pugmire [Sr.], Sam Adair, Nate Adair, George Hanley [Hawley], Hairgraves, and William Hamblin. Ezra Curtis is known to have lived in southern Utah in 1857 and was identified as a massacre participant by eyewitness accounts. The name Hairgraves does not resemble the name of any known individual residing within the jurisdiction of the Iron Military District.

– The Massacre at Mountain Meadows, Turley,

From the Last Confession and Statement of John D. Lee (bold and italics added):

On Thursday evening, John M. Higbee, Major of the Iron Militia, and Philip K. Smith, as he is called generally, but whose name is Klingensmith, Bishop of Cedar City, came to our camp with two or three wagons, and a number of men all well armed. I can remember the following as a portion of the men who came to take part in the work of death which was so soon to follow, viz.: John M. Higbee, Major and commander of the Iron Militia, and also first counselor to Isaac C. Haight; Philip Klingensmith, Bishop of Cedar City; Ira Allen, of the High Council; Robert Wiley, of the High Council; Richard Harrison, of Pinto, also a member of the High Council; Samuel McMurdy, one of the Counselors of Klingensmith; Charles Hopkins, of the City Council of Cedar City; Samuel Pollock; Daniel McFarland, a son-in-law of Isaac C. Haight, and acting as Adjutant under Major Higbee; John Ure, of the City Council; George Hunter, of the City Council; and I honestly believe that John McFarland, now an attorney-at-law at St. George, Utah, was there–I am not positive that he was, but my best impression is that he was there: Samuel Jukes; Nephi Johnson, with a number of Indians under his command; Irvin Jacobs; John Jacobs; E. Curtis, a Captain of Ten; Thomas Cartwright of the City Council and High Council; William Bateman, who afterwards carried the flag of truce to the emigrant camp; Anthony Stratton; A. Loveridge; Joseph Clews; Jabez Durfey; Columbus Freeman, and some others whose names I cannot remember. I know that our total force was fifty-four whites and over three hundred Indians.

From the Warrants of Arrest were issued for:

Jacob (Isaac) Haight, President of the Cedar City Stake; Bishop John M. Higbee and Bishop John D. Lee; Columbus Freeman, William Slade, John Willis, William Riggs, _____ Ingram, Daniel McFarlan, William Stewart, Ira Allen and son, Thomas Cartwright, E. Welean, William Halley, Jabez Nomlen, John Mangum, James Price, John W. Adair, _____ Tyler, Joseph Smith, Samuel Pollock, John McFarlan, Nephi Johnson, _____ Thornton, Joel White, _____ Harrison, Charles Hopkins, Joseph Elang, Samuel Lewis, Sims Matheney, James Mangum, Harrison Pierce, Samuel Adair, F. C. McDulange, Wm. Bateman, Ezra Curtis, and Alexander Loveridge.

From the Utah government site:

Division of Archives and Record Service

People versus John D. Lee

Inventory for District Court (2nd District): Criminal case files, 1855-1895 (Series 24291), Case 31.
Filing date Document description Pages
9/21/1874 9/19/1874 Grand jury subpoena to John Wilden, F Wilden, Elliott Wilden, James Whittaker, T Willis, Robert Keyes, Isabel Bennett 2
9/24/1874 Grand jury indictment against William H Dame, Isaac C Haight, John D Lee, John M Higby, George Adair Jr, Elliott Wilden, Samuel Jukes, Phillip K Smith, and William C. Stewart. (Note: dismissed as to defendant George Adair, Jr) 10
10/3/1874 9/18/1874 Grand jury subpoena to George Winslow, Mrs Goff, Mrs Smith, Mrs Willis, G W Crouch, and William Thompson Sr. 2
12/5/1874 11/20/1874 subpoena to William Young and John Mangum 2
4/2/1875 3/1/1875 subpoena to William Lancy 2
4/2/1875 3/2/1875 subpoena to Isaac Haight, John M Higby, Daniel McFarlane, John McFarlane, William C Stewart, George W Adair Jr, Elliott Wilden, and Ira Hatch 2
4/2/1875 3/2/1875 subpoena to John Willis, J Freeman, A Kirby, Henderson, Henderson, and James A Earl 2
4/2/1875 3/20/1875 subpoena to Emeline Clark, Mrs Hamilton, Martin Slack and Jacob Hamblin 2
4/2/1875 3/20/1875 subpoena to John Hamilton Jr, T J Clark, J W Freeman and William Young 2
4/2/1875 3/20/1875 subpoena to Samuel Willis, Samuel Pollock, Bishop Henry Sant and John Hamilton Sr 2
7/14/1875 Defendant’s request for subpoenas 2
7/21/1875 John D Lee’s plea to indictment 9
7/21/1875 Demurrer to first and second pleas of defendant Lee 3
7/21/1875 Replication to third plea of defendant Lee 2
7/21/1875 Journal entry for 9/24/1874 3
7/22/1875 Rejoinder of John D Lee to the replication of the said people to the third plea in abatement filed by said defendant 2
7/22/1875 Challenge to the array of petit jurors 2
7/28/1875 Telegram to court from W Anderson (Brigham Young’s physician) and George C Bates 6
7/29/1875 Motion not to prosecute further 2
8/2/1875 7/28/1875 notice of taking deposition 2
8/2/1875 7/28/1875 physician’s certificate of W Anderson 2
8/2/1875 7/28/1875 deposition of George A Smith 4
8/2/1875 7/30/1875 deposition of Brigham Young 11
8/6/1875 7/23/1875 subpoena to Teresa Phelps and Robert Bridger 2
8/6/1875 7/31/1875 subpoena to Joseph Betenson Sr, Robert Thimbleby, E W Thompson and Mrs E W Thompson 2
8/7/1875 Prosecution’s jury instructions 6
8/7/1875 Defendant’s jury instructions (given) 12
8/7/1875 Defendant’s jury instructions (refused) 12
8/9/1875 Prosecution’s request for subpoena 2
9/10/1875 8/9/1875 subpoena to Ezra Curtis, Samuel Pollock, William Young, Willis Young, William Mathews, James Mangum, Barney Carter, James Lewis, Beson Lewis and William Slade 2
9/20/1875 8/9/1875 subpoena to Edward Dalton and Mrs F M Stark 2
5/16/1876 4/15/1876 subpoena to William Bradshaw, Robert Kershon, E C Mathews, James Pearce, E W Thompson and John McFarlane 2
5/16/1876 4/15/1876 subpoena to Frank Kane, William Roberts, Isaac Riddle and John Hamilton 2
5/16/1876 4/15/1876 subpoena to Phillip Klingensmith, Joel M White, Ann Eliza Hoge, Thomas Willis, John H Willis, William Mathews, Samuel Pollock and John Sherratt 2
9/4/1876 7/27/1876 subpoena to Daniel Page 2
99/1876 subpoena to Darius Shirts 2
9/20/1876 copy of 9/12/1857 letter from Brigham Young as Governor and ex‑officio Superintendent of Indian Affairs to James W Denver, Commissioner of Indian Affairs 8
9/20/1876 copy of extract of 1/6/1858 letter from Brigham Young as Governor and Superintendent of Indian Affairs to James W Denver, Commissioner of Indian Affairs 5
9/20/1876 copy of Governor’s Proclamation dated 9/20/1876 4
9/20/1876 7/30/1875 deposition of Brigham Young [same as that filed 8/2/1875] 8
9/20/1876 7/30/1875 deposition of George A Smith [same as that filed 8/2/1875] 5
9/20/1876 copy of 9/14/1857 letter from Brigham Young and Daniel Wells to William H Dame 4
9/20/1876 Prosecution’s instructions to the jury 2
9/20/1876 Jury verdict 2
9/21/1876 Receipt for papers 2
9/28/1876 Bill of exceptions of John D Lee 20
10/4/1876 9/14/1876 subpoena to Richard Robinson and Philo Farnsworth 2
10/4/1876 9/15/1876 subpoena to Samuel Wood and Robert Pollock 2
10/5/1876 8/15/1876 subpoena to Elizabeth Hogh and Jonathan Pugmire 2
10/6/1876 Charge of the court to the jury 14
10/10/1876 Journal entry for judgment and sentence 3
10/14/1876 Notice of appeal 2
12/20/1876 copy of 11/20/1857 letter from John D Lee to Brigham Young, Superintendent of Indian Affairs 4
1/3/1877 John D Lee order of commitment 2
1/13/1877 8/21/1876 subpoena to James Pearce, C Shirts and Nephi Johnson 2
1/13/1877 9/11/1876 John D Lee order of commitment 2
2/6/1877 8/21/1876 subpoena to Joel M White, John Thomas, E Landers, Mrs E Landers and Dan Cook 2
2/6/1877 8/14/1876 subpoena to Philip Klingensmith, Philo Carter, Peter Riggs, H Kempton and Gilbert Moss 3
2/23/1877 Supreme Court remittitur 4
ca. 2/27/1877 fragment of Supreme Court minute entry 2
4/23/1877 transcript and order fixing day of execution and return on order of execution 4/24/1877 4
undated document title sheet “documentary evidence” 1
undated fragment jury instruction 1
undated signature list 3

http://www.archives.state.ut.us/research/guides/criminal-johndlee.htm

It appears that the Cedar City militia was the group instructed to walk beside the unarmed emigrant men and shoot them when they hear the signal. Though we don’t have verification that this was Ezra Houghton Curtis’s role, it is possible.

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
From http://www.1857ironcountymilitia.com/index.php?title=Ezra_H._Curtis:

Ezra Curtis, his personal and family background, and his involvement in the Mountain Meadows Massacre

Biographical Sketch
Early Life in Pennsylvania, Missouri and Illinois

Ezra Houghton Curtis was born in 1823 in western Pennsylvania to Enos Curtis and Ruth Franklin. He was the tenth of fourteen children. His father was an early convert to Mormonism and one of its earliest missionaries. In 1831, Enos Curtis had a role in the eventual conversion of future Mormon leaders Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball.

In 1835, 12-year-old Ezra Houghton was baptized a member of the Mormon Church. During the mid-1830s, the Curtis family lived in the Mormon settlements in western Missouri. In the difficulties known in Missouri history as the “Mormon Wars,” they and their fellow Mormons were expelled during the winter of 1838-39 and eventually relocated in the newly-founded Mormon settlements in western Illinois.
Immigration to Utah

Following the assassination of Mormon founder Joseph Smith in 1844 and the continuing unrest between the original settlers of western Illinois and the Mormons, the Curtis family joined the Mormon hegira from western Illinois beyond the Mississippi River into the Iowa and Nebraska territories. In the early winter of 1846, 22-year-old Ezra Curtis married Lucinda Carter (1831-1904), who was nearly 16. A native of Maine, Lucinda was the daughter of Dominicus Carter and Lydia Smith. Their first two children were born in the Mormon settlements in western Iowa, near modern-day Council Bluffs. She would eventually bear him twelve children.

In 1851, after accumulating sufficient means, the extended Curtis family joined a Mormon wagon company and immigrated to Utah Territory. By the mid-1850s, Curtis and his wife and children had moved to southern Utah and settled in Cedar City.
In the Iron Military District: 2nd Lieutenant Ezra Curtis, Company E, Isaac Haight’s 2nd Battalion
Ezra houghton curtis 1.jpg
For 1857, Curtis, 35, was listed in Iron County militia records as a 2nd Lieutenant in one of the militia platoons in Company E. Irishman Samuel Pollack was sergeant in the same platoon. The platoons in Company E were led by Captain Elias Morris, a Welch emigrant, and that company was attached to the 2nd Battalion under the leadership of Major Isaac C. Haight.

Multiple sources attest to Ezra Curtis’s presence at Mountain Meadows during the week of the massacre. Mormon herdsman Henry Higgins observed Curtis among the militia detachment departing Cedar City for the Meadows on the evening of Monday, September 7. John D. Lee mentioned Curtis as among those in the area on Thursday evening when the final militia council was held, the one that led to the deceptive ploy to trick the Arkansas company into abandoning their defensive wagon circle. Curtis’s exact role in the final massacre on Friday, September 11 is not known with certainty but it seems probable that he was among the Cedar City militiamen who accompanied the emigrant men away from the wagon circle in their northward line of march.

Curtis’s name is included in the 1859 arrest warrant issued by Judge John Cradlebaugh. In 1875, during the first trial of John D. Lee, Samuel Pollock identified Curtis as among those who mustered to Mountain Meadows early in the week. Lee also mentioned Curtis in his posthumously-published autobiography, Mormonism Unveiled.
Later Life
Curtis ezra houghton 2.jpg
After the dual disasters of the massacre and the failure of the iron works in Cedar City, Curtis and his family joined the exodus from that troubled settlement. They moved north to Provo where he pursued farming.

During the late 1860s, Curtis was in the militia and played some role in the Mormon-Native American conflict known as the Black Hawk War. In the Centennial History of Sevier County published in 1947, Ezra Curtis was remembered as a noted veteran of that conflict.

In 1875, they moved back to southern Utah to pioneer at Willow Bend, now Aurora, in the high broad valley drained by the Sevier River. It is not known whether this move from Provo to the more remote mountainous region in southern Utah was prompted by the indictment and prosecution of former Iron County militiamen for their complicity in the massacre or by other considerations.

Eventually, Curtis took a plural wife, Juliaette Everett, who bore him seven more children. His first wife, Lucinda, died in 1904. In 1915, Curtis died in Aurora, Sevier, Utah where he had lived for four decades. He was survived by his second wife and his many children.

Our thanks to John Warnke for further background on Ezra Curtis.
Note: The histories of Emery County refer to an Ezra Curtis, or E. Curtis, Sr., who was an early settler in Emery County in 1878j. This Ezra Curtis was a militiaman in Sanpete County in the mid-1860s who first ventured into what would later become Emery County in pursuit of marauding Ute Indians during the Black Hawk War. In 1905, his wife Mary Ann filed for divorce against him claiming that he was “an habitual drunkard” who swore at her and the children, according to a story in the local newspaper. This does not appear to be the same individual as Ezra Houghton Curtis, 1823-1915.
References

Bagley, Blood of the Prophets, 12; Bigler and Bagley, Innocent Blood: Essential Narratives, 235; Bishop, A History of Sevier County, 85; Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, 832; FamilySearch.org; Lee, Mormonism Unveiled, 232, 276, 379; Lee Trial transcripts; Shirts and Shirts, A Trial Furnace, 495; Walker, et al, Massacre at Mountain Meadows, Appendix C, 257; Warnke, “Biographical sketch of Ezra Houghton Curtis, 1823-1915″; and Warnock, Through the Years: A Centennial History of Sevier County, 107, 108 (photo), 110, 122.
External Links

For more information on Ezra Houghton Curtis see:

http://mountainmeadowsmassacre.org/appendices/appendix-c-the-militiamen

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=9055559

Further information and confirmation needed. Please contact editor@1857ironcountymilitia.com.

Wilford Woodruff:

“Men have tried to lay that [the Mountain Meadows massacre] to President Young. I was with President Young when the massacre was first reported to him. President Young was perfectly horrified at the recital of it, and wept over it. He asked: “Was there any white man had anything to do with that?” The reply was No; and by the representations then made to him he was misinformed concerning the whole transaction. I will say here, and call heaven and earth to witness, that President Young, during his whole life, never was the author of the shedding of the blood of any of the human family; and when the books are opened in the day of judgment these things will be proven to heaven and earth.”
Millennial Star, May 28, 1894, 338

For more information on the Massacre, see Richard E. Turley Jr., “The Mountain Meadows Massacre,” Ensign, Sep 2007, 14–21

The following information desperately needs verification, but is included here for research purposes. This is from http://www.1857ironcountymilitia.com/index.php?title=Ezra_H._Curtis:

Biographical Sketch

Early Life in Pennsylvania, Missouri and Illinois
Ezra Houghton Curtis was born in 1823 in western Pennsylvania to Enos Curtis and Ruth Franklin. He was the tenth of fourteen children. His father was an early convert to Mormonism and one of its earliest missionaries. In 1831, Enos Curtis had a role in the eventual conversion of future Mormon leaders Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball.
In 1835, 12-year-old Ezra Houghton was baptized a member of the Mormon Church. During the mid-1830s, the Curtis family lived in the Mormon settlements in western Missouri. In the difficulties known in Missouri history as the “Mormon Wars,” they and their fellow Mormons were expelled during the winter of 1838-39 and eventually relocated in the newly-founded Mormon settlements in western Illinois.
Immigration to Utah
Following the assassination of Mormon founder Joseph Smith in 1844 and the continuing unrest between the original settlers of western Illinois and the Mormons, the Curtis family joined the Mormon hegira from western Illinois beyond the Mississippi River into the Iowa and Nebraska territories. In the early winter of 1846, 22-year-old Ezra Curtis married Lucinda Carter (1831-1904), who was nearly 16. A native of Maine, Lucinda was the daughter of Dominicus Carter and Lydia Smith. Their first two children were born in the Mormon settlements in western Iowa, near modern-day Council Bluffs. She would eventually bear him twelve children.
In 1851, after accumulating sufficient means, the extended Curtis family joined a Mormon wagon company and immigrated to Utah Territory.
To Cedar City and the Ironworks
The Early Ironworks in Cedar City
By the mid-1850s, Curtis and his wife and children had moved to southern Utah and settled in Cedar City. His sister, Celestia Curtis Durfee, and his brother-in-law, Jabez Durfee, were also pioneering members of the new settlement.

Ezra Houghton Curtis Iron Work

The Early Ironworks in Cedar City

The Ironworks in 1857
In April 1857, the delivery of a new steam engine from Great Salt Lake City seemed to breathe new life into the ironworks. Working from April to June they installed the steam engine and completed the new engine house. In the first week of July, they were ready to begin smelting. They “put on the blast” and had a modicum of success. But they continued to be plagued with problems ranging from poor quality raw materials to smelting equipment that lacked technical sophistication. When in late July the steam engine seized with sand from the dirty creek water, they speedily dug a reservoir to store a supply of clean water for the boiler. They continued making smelting runs through August. All the while crews at the ironworks manned all the necessary functions there, while other crews, mainly miners and teamsters, gathered the raw materials – iron ore, coal, limestone, and wood – necessary to sustain smelting.
The smelting continued until September 13. In other words, around September 3, when a dispute arose between some settlers and several men in the passing Arkansas company, the blast furnace was running nonstop. And when Cedar City militiamen, many of them ironworkers, mustered to Mountain Meadows where they were involved in the massacre on September 11, other ironworkers in Cedar City continued the smelting runs night and day. For additional details, see Smelting at the Ironworks in 1857.
From late April to September, those working up the canyon in mining or hauling wood, coal, limestone, rock, sand or “adobies” to the ironworks were Isaac C. Haight, James Williamson, George Hunter, Joseph H. Smith, Ira Allen, Ellott Wilden, Swen Jacobs, Alex Loveridge, Joel White, Ezra Curtis, Samuel McMurdie, Samuel Pollock, John Jacobs, John M. Higbee, John M. Macfarlane, Samuel Jewkes, Nephi Johnson, Thomas Cartwright, William Bateman, Elias Morris, Benjamin Arthur, Joseph H. Smith, Robert Wiley, and Philip Klingensmith. Those working at the ironworks on the furnace, engine, coke ovens or blacksmith shop included Elias Morris, John Humphries, Ira Allen, John Urie, Benjamin Arthur, James Williamson, Joseph H. Smith, Samuel Jewkes, Joseph Clews, Richard Harrison, William C. Stewart, William Bateman, John M Macfarlane, John M. Higbee, John Jacobs, George Hunter, Samuel Pollock, William S. Riggs, Alex Loveridge, Ellott Wilden, Ezra Curtis, Eliezar Edwards, Swen Jacobs, Joel White, and Thomas Cartwright. (The two lists overlap because some worked both in the canyon and at the Ironworks.) Other prominent figures at the ironworks who were not later involved at Mountain Meadows were Samuel Leigh, George Horton, James H. Haslem, Laban Morrell, John Chatterley, Thomas Gower, Thomas Crowther and others.

Curtis’s Role at the Ironworks in 1857
During this period in 1857, Curtis was a teamster who provided a team and wagon to haul a variety of materials including charcoal, “adobies,” coal, fire clay, and rock to the Ironworks. During the iron run in August 1857, Curtis hauled several tons of coal to maintain the blast in the furnace.
The majority of the southern Utah militiamen at Mountain Meadows were from Cedar City. Of these, nearly all of them had worked at the Ironworks or supplied raw materials to it. Indeed, in the weeks before the Mountain Meadows Massacre, they had worked intensely together, hauling materials, building a new water reservoir, and making the latest run of the blast furnace. One perennial mystery of the massacre has been why the militiamen mustered to Mountain Meadows in “broken” militia units; that is, from different platoons and companies, none of which had a full compliment of its members. Perhaps the reason lies with the Ironworks. Those in the Ironworks knew each other and had worked alongside one another. Not only did Ezra Curtis knew those who mustered from Cedar City to Mountain Meadows, he had worked with them at the Ironworks as recently as the week before. Perhaps the answer is that the men of the Ironworks were on hand and available and Isaac Haight, who himself had worked closely with them, assigned them to muster to Mountain Meadows.
In the Iron Military District: 2nd Lieutenant Ezra Curtis, Company E, Isaac Haight’s 2nd Battalion

In 1857, the Iron Military District consisted of four battalions led by regimental commander Col. William H. Dame. The platoons and companies in the first battalion drew on men in and around Parowan. (It had no involvement at Mountain Meadows.) Major Isaac Haight commanded the 2nd Battalion whose personnel in its many platoons and two companies came from Cedar City and outer-lying communities to the north such as Fort Johnson. Major John Higbee headed the 3rd Battalion whose many platoons and two companies were drawn from Cedar City and outer-lying communities to the southwest such as Fort Hamilton. Major John D. Lee of Fort Harmony headed the 4th Battalion whose platoons and companies drew on its militia personnel from Fort Harmony, the Southerners at the newly-founded settlement in Washington, the Indian interpreters at Fort Clara, and the new settlers at Pinto.

For 1857, Curtis, 35, was listed in Iron County militia records as a 2nd Lieutenant in one of the militia platoons in Company E. Irishman Samuel Pollack was sergeant in the same platoon while Curtis’s brother-in-law, Jabez Durfee, was a private in the platoon. The platoons in Company E were led by Captain Elias Morris, a Welch emigrant, and that company was attached to the 2nd Battalion under the leadership of Major Isaac C. Haight. See A Basic Account for a full description of the massacre.
Multiple sources attest to Ezra Curtis’s presence at Mountain Meadows during the week of the massacre. Mormon herdsman Henry Higgins observed Curtis among the militia detachment departing Cedar City for the Meadows on the evening of Monday, September 7.
John D. Lee mentioned Curtis as among those in the area on Thursday evening when the final militia council was held, the one that led to the deceptive ploy to trick the Arkansas company into abandoning their defensive wagon circle.
Curtis’s exact role in the final massacre on Friday, September 11 is not known with certainty but it seems probable that he was among the Cedar City militiamen who accompanied the emigrant men away from the wagon circle in their northward line of march. As the massacre commenced, the duty of these guards was to wheel and fire on the emigrant men, quickly dispatching them. Yet during the actual massacre, reactions varied among the guards. Some shrank from their duty, others fired over the heads of their victims, while others still undertook their bloody duty with zeal. Within minutes, members of the Cedar City unit had killed all but three of the emigrant men. However, whether Curtis was in this guard unit and if so, how he acted during the massacre will probably never be known with any certainty.
Curtis’s name is included in the 1859 arrest warrant issued by Judge John Cradlebaugh. In 1875, during the first trial of John D. Lee, Samuel Pollock identified Curtis as among those who mustered to Mountain Meadows early in the week. Lee also mentioned Curtis in his posthumously-published autobiography, Mormonism Unveiled.
Abandoning Cedar City for Northern Utah
After the dual disasters of the massacre and the failure of the ironworks in Cedar City, Curtis and his family joined the exodus from that troubled settlement. They moved north to Provo where he pursued farming.
During the late 1860s, Curtis was in the militia and played some role in the Mormon-Native American conflict known as the Black Hawk War. In the Centennial History of Sevier County, published in 1947, Ezra Curtis was remembered as a noted veteran of that conflict.
Settling in the Sevier Valley
In 1875, they moved back to southern Utah to pioneer at Willow Bend, now Aurora, in the high broad valley drained by the Sevier River. His brother-in-law and sister, Jabez Durfee and Celestia Curtis Durfee, also pioneered this new region. It is not known whether this move from Provo to the more remote mountainous region in southern Utah was prompted by the indictment and prosecution of former Iron County militiamen for their complicity in the massacre or by other considerations. However, their move to the Sevier Valley coincided with an intense expansion of Mormon settlements in the higher-elevation mountain valleys. Participation in the migration to these new and promising valleys seems just as likely as a motive.
From 1877 to 1879, Curtis was the bishop in Salina in the Sevier Valley. Eventually, Curtis took a plural wife, Juliaette Everett, who bore him seven more children.
Final Years
His first wife, Lucinda, died in 1904.
In 1915, Curtis died in Aurora, Sevier, Utah where he had lived for four decades. He was survived by his second wife and his many children.

Our thanks to John Warnke for further background on Ezra Curtis.

Note: The histories of Emery County refer to an Ezra Curtis, or E. Curtis, Sr., who was an early settler in Emery County in 1878. This Ezra Curtis was a militiaman in Sanpete County who first ventured into what would later become Emery County in pursuit of marauding Ute Indians during the Black Hawk War in the mid-1860s. In 1905, his wife Mary Ann filed for divorce against him claiming that he was “an habitual drunkard” who swore at her and the children, according to a story in the local newspaper. This does not appear to be the same individual as Ezra Houghton Curtis (1823-1915).
References

Bagley, Blood of the Prophets, 12; Bigler and Bagley, Innocent Blood: Essential Narratives, 235; Bishop, A History of Sevier County, 85; Brooks, Journal of the Southern Indian Mission,” 129 fn. 70, citing the diary of George Washington Bean, one of the Las vegas missionaries. Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, 832; Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church, 738 (Salina); Lee, Mormonism Unveiled, 232, 276, 379; Lee Trial transcripts; New.familysearch.org; Shirts and Shirts, A Trial Furnace, 495; Walker, et al, Massacre at Mountain Meadows, Appendix C, 257; Warnke, “Biographical sketch of Ezra Houghton Curtis, 1823-1915″; Warnock, Through the Years: A Centennial History of Sevier County, 107, 108 (photo), 110, 122; Warnock & Warnock, Sevier Stake Memories, 416.
For full bibliographic information see Bibliography.
External Links

For more information on Ezra Houghton Curtis see:

http://mountainmeadowsmassacre.org/appendices/appendix-c-the-militiamen

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=9055559

Deseret Iron Company Account Book, 1854-1867: http://www.footnote.com/document/241905844/
Further information and confirmation needed. Please contact editor@1857ironcountymilitia.com.

History of Aurora (Willow Bend), Utah

Aurora was founded in 1875 by Ezra White (or Ezra Curtis, according to some accounts) and three other families along the banks of the Sevier River. Aurora’s settling came under the direction of Brigham Young. He called on families to settle South Central Utah. Originally named Willow Bend, the name was changed to Aurora due to the presence of the Northern Lights. The city was moved west two to three miles along the Rocky Ford Canal to avoid the spring flooding accompanied life along the Sevier. This location also enabled significant cultivation of the foothills. Those families that settled the region often left comfortable surroundings of Northern Utah to settle what one original resident described as a desolate region without a green tree in sight. Over time however, settlers planted crops, trees, and utilized irrigation to create a very beautiful and livable community.

Nestled in the fertile Sevier Valley, Aurora slowly grew as greater numbers of settlers moved west. While growth occurred more rapidly in the accompanying communities of Salina and Richfield, Aurora grew largely due to the settling of children of many of the large families in the city. Most current residents are able to track their lineage to one of the four founding families of the city.

https://www.princeton.edu/~achaney/tmve/wiki100k/docs/Aurora,_Utah.html

Burial:
Aurora Cemetery
Aurora
Sevier County
Utah, USA
Plot: Block 14. Grave 35.

Created by: John Warnke
Record added: Jul 07, 2004
Find A Grave Memorial# 9055559

Ezra Houghton CurtisEzra Houghton Curtis Grave

Ezra Houghton Curtis headstone 3

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