William Stewart Seeley, 1812

BIRTH: 18 May 1812, Pickering, York, Ontario, Canada
DEATH: 18 September 1896, Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, United States

From the Seeley Genealogical Society website:

William Stewart SeeleyWilliam Stewart Seeley

Seeley house

William Stewart Seeley House. Still there (2013), on State street and between first and second south, on the west side of the street.

LDS Biographical Encyclopedia: A Compilation of Biographical Sketches of Prominent Men and Women in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints” by Andrew Jenson, Salt Lake City, UT: Andrew Jenson History Co., 1901.

See another biography from a different source.

[William Stewart is SGS# 2336 – William Stewart; Justus Azel; Justus William; Joseph; John; Benjamin; Nathaniel, Robert]

Look for Justus Azel Seeley in Justus Azel Seely from “Esshom, Frank Elwood. “Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah.” Salt Lake City, UT: Utah Pioneers Book Publishing Co., 1913.

Seeley plaque

William Stewart Seeley gets Kidnapped

The Following is an excerpt from the official History of the Church, volume 3:

This day about noon, Captain Bogart, with some thirty or forty men called on Brother Thoret Parsons, at the head of the east branch of Log creek, where he was living, and warned him to be gone before next day at ten in the morning, declaring also that he would give Far West thunder and lightning before next day at noon, if he had good luck in meeting Neil Gillum, (Cornelius Gilliam) who would camp about six miles west of Far West that night, and that he should camp on Crooked creek. He then departed towards Crooked creek.

“Brother Parsons dispatched a messenger with this news to Far West, and followed after Bogart to watch his movements. Brothers Joseph Holbrook and David Juda, who went out this morning to watch the movements of the enemy, saw eight armed mobbers call at the house of Brother Pinkham, where they took three prisoners, Nathan Pinkham, Brothers William Seely and Addison Green, and four horses, arms, etc. When departing they threatened Father Pinkham that if he did not leave the state immediately they “would have his damned old scalp.” Having learned of Bogart’s movements the brethren returned to Far West near midnight, and reported their proceedings and those of the mob.

“On hearing the report, Judge Elias Higbee, the first judge of the county, ordered Lieutenant Colonel Hinkle, the highest officer in command in Far West, to send out a company to disperse the mob and retake their prisoners, whom, it was reported, they intended to murder that night. The trumpet sounded, and the brethren were assembled on the public square about midnight, when the facts were stated, and about seventy-five volunteered to obey the judge’s order, under command of Captain David W. Patten, who immediately commenced their march on horseback, hoping without the loss of blood to surprise and scatter the camp, retake the prisoners and prevent the attack threatening Far West.

“Thursday, 25.–Fifteen of the company were detached from the main body while sixty continued their march till they arrived near the ford of Crooked river, (or creek) where they dismounted, tied their horses, and leaving four or five men to guard them, proceeded towards the ford, not knowing the location of the encampment. It was just at the dawning of light in the east, when they were marching quietly along the road, and near the top of the hill which descends to the river that the report of a gun was heard, and young Patrick O’Banion reeled out of the ranks and fell mortally wounded. Thus the work of death commenced, when Captain Patten ordered a charge and rushed down the hill on a fast trot, and when within about fifty yards of the camp formed a line. The mob formed a line under the bank of the river, below their tents. It was yet so dark that little could be seen by looking at the west, while the mob looking towards the dawning light, could see Patten and his men, when they fired a broadside, and three or four of the brethren fell. Captain Patten ordered the fire returned, which was instantly obeyed, to great disadvantage in the darkness which yet continued. The fire was repeated by the mob, and returned by Captain Patten’s company, who gave the watchword “God and Liberty.” Captain Patten then ordered a charge, which was instantly obeyed. The parties immediately came in contact, with their swords, and the mob were soon put to flight, crossing the river at the ford and such places as they could get a chance. In the pursuit, one of the mob fled from behind a tree, wheeled, and shot Captain Patten, who instantly fell, mortally wounded, having received a large ball in his bowels.

“The ground was soon cleared, and the brethren gathered up a wagon or two, and making beds therein of tents, etc, took their wounded and retreated towards Far West. Three brethren were wounded in the bowels, one in the neck, one in the shoulder, one through the hips, one through both thighs, one in the arms, all by musket shot. One had his arm broken by a sword. Brother Gideon Carter was shot in the head, and left dead on the ground so defaced that the brethren did not know him. Bogart reported that he had lost one man. The three prisoners were released and returned with the brethren to Far West. Captain Patten was carried some of the way in a litter, but it caused so much distress that he begged to be left by the way side. He was carried into Brother Winchester’s, three miles from the city of Far West, where he died that night. Patrick O’Banion died soon after, and Brother Carter’s body was also brought from Crooked river, when it was discovered who he was.”

– History of the Church, Vol. 3

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The following is an excerpt mentioning the William Stewart Seeley (pioneer) company, from the autobiography of August Adrainus Hjorth (1847-1935)

I made two trips after immigrants. The first was with ox team in the year 1866. I went to Florence, across the river from Winter Quarters. There were three companies; the John R. Murdock company of Salt Lake City, the William Stewart Seeley company of Sanpete County, and the “Appy” Wolf company of Cache Valley.

They arrived at the Green River about the same time. Each company had about sixty wagons. There were four head of oxen to each wagon, making about 240 head of cattle in the three companies. We had trouble getting our cattle across the river, which at this point was about a mile wide. Most of them swam across, but there were about seventeen head that would not swim; so they were loaded on a ferryboat. About halfway across, the cattle croded toward one side of the boat, causeig it to tip. The tackle broke and all were thrown into the river. Some of the men got back on the boat, some caught on planks, but several were drowned, my companion being one of them. [See Church History account of this incident.]”

in Chronicles of Courage, Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, pub. 1991, pg. 189

WSS1

Pioneer Travel

Several small accounts can be found on the Pioneer Overland Travel site, both about William himself, and about his company:

THURSDAY EVENING, 27.
THE IMMIGRATION.—We have been favored with the following telegrams to President B. Young:

FORT BRIDGER, Aug. 27.
My train passed here to-day. Getting along finely.
D. D. MCARTHUR.
ECHO CITY, Aug 27.
My train passed here at nine o’clock, a.m. All well. Will be in the City on Saturday.
W. S. SEELY.

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SATURDAY EVENING, 29 September 1868.
COME IN.—Capt. W. S. Seeley’s ox train, consisting of thirty-nine teams, arrived this afternoon. Eleven contained freight for Messrs. Eldredge & Clawson. There were 272 passengers, mostly English. They started from Benton exactly four weeks since. Four deaths occurred—one elderly lady and three small children.

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“Immigration,” Semi-Weekly Telegraph, 27 Aug. 1868, 3.

MONDAY EVENING, 24.
IMMIGRATION.—We have been favored with the following telegram to President Young from Capt. W. L. Seeley’s train:

MUDDY, 8 MILES NORTH OF BRIDGER,
August 23, 1868.
We camped here last night. We leave here this evening. All well. Stock doing well.

PHILLIP HURST.

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Deseret Evening News, 19 Aug. 1868, p. 2

BENTON, D. T., Aug. 6, 1868.

George Q. Cannon, Esq:—Dear Brother,—Enclosed I send list of Saints in my train which left Laramie on the 1st inst.

The health of the Saints is generally good, and they are all in good spirits in the expectation of soon reaching Utah; We have had one death which please insert a notice of.

With best respects to all,

I remain your brother in the gospel,
WM. S. SEELEY.Names of the Saints who left Laramie City, Aug. 1, 1868, in Capt W. S. Seeley’s train, for Salt Lake City.

Carl C. Asmussen; Eliza A. Adams; George Bishop and wife; Nicholas Batley; John [Mason] Burnside, wife and six children; John Burrill; Wm. [William] Coombe, wife, daughter; Theodore Curtis; Thos. [Thomas] Campbell, wife and three children; Charles Dummer and wife; Chas. [Charles]Dummer, Jr.; Wm. [William] Dummer, wife and four children; Chas. [Charles] Draper, wife and four children; Edmund Ellis, wife and three children; Wm. [William] Fawcett and wife; Robert Ford, wife and four children; Alex. [Alexander] Fife, wife and three children; John Fyfe, wife and three children; Matthew Frith; George Goble and wife; William Griffiths; Daniel Hall, wife and two children; James Hunter, wife and child; Richard Hunter, wife and one child; Andrew Hill, wife and two children; Robert Harker, wife and three children; Thos. [Thomas] Horne and wife; Thomas Johnson, wife and three children; Isaac Jones. wife and two children; Dav. A, [David Atherly] Kerr, wife and two children; John Larson; John Lunn, wife and five children; Leder [Ledru C.] Loveridge; Peter Lethbridge; Benj. [Behjamin] Laws, wife and two children; John Mead, wife and four children; James Montgomery; Thomas Morgan, wife and child, Elizabeth Nicholas; David Owens, wife and three children; Maria Pedersen; Marian Pedersen; Samuel Preston, wife and two children; William Pearson and wife; John Pembroke, wife and three children; Elizabeth Pearson; George Paramore and wife; Simon [Simeon] Pickering, wife and two children; Brown [Bower] Petit, wife and child; David Russell, wife and four children; Joseph Salisbury, wife and two children; James [W.] Stiff and wife; Henry Smith; Martin Sorensen; William Sorensen; Wm. [William] Smith, wife and five children; Samuel Stewart; James Stewart; William H. Scott and wife; Thomas Smithfield and wife; Thomas Scott; William Sargent, wife and child; John Sargent, wife and three children; John Skinner, wife and nine children; Bartil [Bartle] Turner, Senr. and wife; Bartil [Bartle] Turner junr; Joseph Turner and wife; Hugh [Williams] Thomas, wife and four children; John Teasdale, wife and two children; Thomas Tibble, wife and four children; William Joseph Underwood, wife and six children; James [Thomas] Underwood, wife and three children; G. H. [Gilbert Thomas] Van-Schoonover; Jesse Wright; Edward Wildman, wife and four children; Thomas Watkins, wife and daughter; Jane [Jane Caroline Pollard] Wiscombe and seven children; George [Alfred] Wiscombe, wife and two children; George Woodman, wife and two children.

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Lyman, Albert Robison, An Appreciation and a Biographical Sketch of Benjamin Perkins, 1936, 5-7.

. . . first of August.

“As we traveled through the states people would come to meet us wherever we stopped, and they would try to persuade us not to come to Utah, telling us the people in Utah were a bad lot. I told them I was acquainted with quite a few of the people there, and I could not see how they could have gone from good to bad in such a short time, anyway I was going on and see for myself.

On the train we got acquainted with quite a number of Welch people, and some of them expressed their regrets that we were going to Utah to live among the terrible Mormons.

Before we got off the train we got a sight of the emigration teams waiting there for us. Four or five hundred people were gathered around the camp indulging in a rough and rather uncouth dance. There were no ladies participating, however; it was only a stag dance of the teamsters.

The language they used was very astonishing to us from the old country where we expected to find the people of Zion almost perfect. If such language had been used by the Church members in Wales, they would have been required to ask the pardon of the other members. But we soon became acquainted with their ways and shortly became one with them.

We started on West with the teams next morning, and traveled three days, going of necessity very slow because some of our members were still ill and others just recovering.

On the morning of the fourth day we met another party of teamsters going back after more emigrants, and their captain asked our captian for six volunteers to take the place of six of his men who had been drowned at Green River by a boat breaking loose.

I was one of the volunteers. The affection of my friends was certainly shown at this time—I was almost suffocated with farewell hugs and kisses.

I was given charge of a team but of course it was necessary for me to have some assistance as these were the first oxen I had ever seen worked. For sometime I couldn’t tell the oxen apart and often hitched up the wrong one.

A corral was made of the wagons to keep them in at night. It was a practice of mine to be among the first to hitch up, but as a rule I was among the last to leave as I so often had the wrong ox, and frequently had the off ox on the near side; very much to the disgust of the oxen and the teamsters.

When a teamster would miss his oxen, he would come and examine my outfit, and too often he would find there what he was looking for, and it became a byword among the crowd, “Look out for that d—–d Welchman.”

One morning as I was leaving with my six oxen they stopped me and took six out of my team, leaving me to go and find my own oxen.

The crownd was divided into parties of six, and as I was a new hand they were all willing to let me show how much I could do around a camp. As soon as the oxen were unyoked, my orders came thick and and fast from all sides. It was “Ben get some water,” “Ben, get some wood.” When it had gone on a week, I decided I had had enough of it. So after bringing in the wood, when the order came to get the water, I told them in my plainest English, for I was learning now to speak a little English, “Go to Hell!” The fellow jerked off his coat, and taking it as a warning I jerked off mine. He asked if I meant what I said and in my broken Welch and English I gave him to understand that I meant it all and more. After that I had considerable troulbe [trouble] with them and several times the boss threatened to show me my place.

Our next stop was at Echo Canyon, a Mormon camp on the railroad. Oh what a pleasant reunion! I had found a number of my boy friends from Wales. After giving them an account of my trip I had a hand full in keeping them from making a row over the way I had been treated, and the only way I could pacify them was by promising to stay there with them in the camp. So I stayed, but I had difficulty getting the boss of the teams to let me off.

When the boss found out that I wanted to earn money to send for my parents and the rest of the family in Wales, he gave me forty dollars with a “Bod bless you,” and he promised I would soon have the necessary money.”

This company from Laramie City to Echo Canyon was under the Direction of President William S. Seeley. There were thirty-nine wagons and 272 souls, though four of them died on the trip. . . .

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Simmons, Mary C., Autobiographical sketch, 1-2.

Written at the request of my children and others, May 1932.

Mary C[ulmer]. Simmons born January 21st 1863 of goodly parents, Frederick and Mary Kennett Culmer, in Bermondsey, Kent, England.

I can remember going with Mother at the age of five, to bid her parents goodby before imigrating to America in 1867. I remember my grand parents home in beautiful Kent, England. It was a thatched house with steep roof and sanded floor, so sweet and clean and smelling of raspberries, as we had some for dinner.

With my parents and brothers William [Harrison,] and Harry [Henry Adolphus Lavender,] and sister Nellie [Ellen Emily] we crossed the Atlantic Ocean in the sailing vessel “The Hudson”, embarking at Liverpool June 20th 1867. We were fifty-eight days crossing the Atlantic. I was a very delicate child and was laced in the berth most of the way to keep me from falling out, and to keep me dry for the old ship would rock so that the big air funnels, three or four feet across, would scoop up the water and flood the lower deck, where we were. It was a very old ship, this being the last trip it ever made. Father being a sailor, and my brothers were allowed to help in many ways, in this way helping to pay our passage.

My parents were advised to stay in Brooklyn for a year because it was unsafe to journey west at that time, as the Indians were on the war path through the Black Hills that year. My Father and brothers obtained work in Brooklyn

and the next year 1868 we started across the plains in Captain Seeley’s Company, journeying as far as Larimie Wyoming by train, this being the end of the railroad, most of the way in cattle cars, with just boards put across for seats, no back to lean against. I remember, as a child of six, how dreadfully the cars smelled.

Father had a sun stroke at Larimie, which was only a trading post at that tieme. While we were waiting for the wagon train to be made up, he was just taken in the shade of a high board fence to recover. I was very frightened.

Our train had two span of mules to each wagon. I remember a big herd of bison stampeding the mules of our train, also being attached [attacked] by the Indians with their faces all painted red and white, yelling and screaming as they rushed into our camp. The wagons were in a circle with the tongues in the center. I think the attack was made before the men were able to get the mules herded inside the circle, after taking them to water, as I know there was a terrible excitement. I recall the steep canyon roads both up and down, but down mostly, where the wagons would slide off the big rocks, much larger than the wagons, and fording streams so deep the mules and cattle would swim and the men made rafts to take the wagons across. At other times I remember seeing my Mother dragging through sand more than ankle deep, and again through rain and mud while hunting a place to camp. I am so glad there are moving pictures of all this, so true to what it was.

One of my clearest memories is when we arrived at Echo, in Echo Canyon, in the Rockies, there was a ranch house along the side of the road and Father bought a pound of fresh butter. I will never forget the smell and taste of that butter, perhaps the first taste of real fresh butter in my life, but the first of any kind for, no[w] a year, as we had always lived in a city where one buys butter from kegs.

Another memory is of a moonlight night when the camp was all settled and made safe, the people would gather around the campfire and after some prayer and singing, there would be dancing. Some would be mending clothes for the next day while others would be mending harnesses by the light of the camp-fire. The singing and joking was done mostly by the middle aged as both the young and the very aged were glad to rest.

We arrived in Salt Lake City, Utah in August 1868 and were met by my oldest brother, Alfred who arrived in Salt Lake in 1862, and my sister Esther and brother George F. who arrived in 1864; our parents having sent them on ahead to a great unknown country, preparatory to coming themselves with the remainder of the family. What a reunion! I wonder could we do the same?

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Street, Alexander, Journals and reminiscences, 1895–1898 and 1903, fd. 2, vol. 2, 11p.

We landed at Laremca [Laramie] the termanous [terminus] of the U.P.R.R. in the then teretory [territory] of Wyoming. Where Captain Lovelin of Brigham City was awaiting us with a mule train of I should think 55 or 60 wagons to take us on to Zion. We had singing & prayer in the morning and at night. We slept on the ground with the fermemment [firmament] for our tent the moon and stars for our light. The wagons at night would form a cicle [c]ircle corrall with a small opening at each end in this shape O the horses, mules or cattle would be drove in the corrall to catch them.

When we had got about 100 miles we met a train or oxen about the same nu[m]ber of oxen wagons[.] the captain’s name was [William S.] Seeley from Sanpete[.] in coming across Green River 5 of there te[a]msters had got drowned and they asked me to go and take one of the teams to drive[.] My parents consented and I was glad to go[.] I was then near 20 years of age, I must tell of a dream I had before we left England[.] in my dream I saw the wagons as plain as I saw them on the plains wich was a testemony to me. A[n]other dream I had that was fullfilled before we left in Part I thought I went to meeting as usually[.] I went the same path through the same door gate the same room[.] When I sat down I could see through the door into the bed room that some of the saints where holding a other meeting it was not many weeks till a Josephite Preacher came a long and convirted a number of our members and they began to hold meetings. I have seen quite a number apotitese [apostates] but I have got the First one to see that ever amounted to anything[.] they have a discontented spirit contenthus [contentious,] unhappy with a desire to make others as themselves[.] This is a great testimony to me when but a boy.

The first day after excepting the hosision [position] of a te[a]mster the boys c[o]upled 4 of the wagons to gether with 12 yoke of oxen to pull them[,] put a whip about 10 ft. Long with a handle 6 or 7 ft. into my hands and told me to drive them. I got a long farley Well[,] only I did not know what to say to the cattle and as each one had a name[.] 2 names was not learnt in a minute but I could hit them with the whip but after a while the stage came along and I got the Leaders out of the and was going nicely around the stage but as June soon as the Leaders got as far as was there costum [custom] they turned back into the road which pulled the Suting and Wheel Cattle into the stage[.] they all had a good laugh at me both captains teamsters and the people in and on the coach[.] the teamsters came to my aid and knowing what to say soon got the thing righted.

The next day they gave me 3 yoak of oxen and one wagon[.] they told me to say ge[e] when I wanted them to go to right ana [and] hagh [haw]. When I wanted them to go to the Left hand[.] they told me to call the oxen by share their separate names[.] I was a long time before I could call them by their proper names and many times I would say ge[e] when I ment haug, my gratest difficulity was when the oxen where brought into the corrall to be yoked up[,] the yoke was after this shape ‘m'[.] this is not a good one[.] the neck was in those loos the yoke on top of the neck a kee [key] through the loo on top of the yoke[.] the teamster would put the yoke on the left shoulder and would aproach the ox on the ox [h]is left side and with the loo[p] in the right hand would slip it under the neck and through the holls [holes] in the yoke and would then take the other and get the ox that worked on the other side. Those oxen got so used to it and to thier drivers that they could call the ox by name and he would come with out any firther trouble[.] being brought up to labor in the mines it was hard for me to learn[.] the trouble was I could not tell my oxen among so many about 360 besides a small band of young steers or cows to kill for meat by the way[.] my whip was a other difficulity[.] I was quite awhile before I could swing my whip and hit what and where I wanted to which was very neccessary to do in order to be a good and safe teamster[.] many a red mark I had on my face and neck from my hown [own] or Kwordness [awkwardness.] I would say not knowing how many times a nice sharp tap with the whip on the right side would bring the ox to the left hagh so suden that the front wheel on the off side of wagon would miss a rock[.] not only would this be neccessary to save the wheel but perhaps some very sick or dieng would be saved a severe shake when one died on those planes[.] they could not have a nice meeting house old Servises [services] in deviated to sute Shuck [such] an event[.] this would be held as before stated with the firmement as the tabernacle mostly in the shades of evening[.] it is then that the boxes that contain what few efects they had would be used[,] perhaps be rolled up in a blanket or quilt where the loved ones would stand and see the dirt put on them[,] weeping often till the train started next morning when they would bid farewell to father, mother brother or sister that lay under the little mound[.] no body knows only those that have passed through it what a sad Expearance some have passed through in order to keep the commandments of God[,] wich Sayes come out of your native land to the place I God have appointed[.] many a father mother brother sister Look back with their minds eye to that lonely spot wishing that body here in our lovely Simeparey [cemetery] to get there share of the decoration day of [w]reaths of flowers but they will have to wait till the resuraction [resurrection] day before they will see those bodies again for many of those mounds have become the same as the other service [surface] of the earth around[,] so that to find the place is next to impossible[.] We had our pleasures as well as sorrows when suitable dansing [dancing,] Singing[,] a Sermon on Sunday. Many a young man and maiden have met for the first time on those plains Sparked and then got married in the indulment [endowment] house when they got to Great Salt Lake as it was then called[.] I got so that I was delighted with that life on the planes[.] I had one more of difficulity on those planes which I would not mention but my history would lack that one to me very intresting part

when we got to the Plat[te] River close to what was known then as Fort Steel some desperadoes serounded our captain as he had gone about ½ a mile ahead of the train to examine the fort ford gust [just] at the edge of the river[.] they were in the willows but they did not have time to hurt him for the Chaplen [Chaplain] for some cause followed and when he saw the captains condition[,] the teamsters soon knew it and as the desperadoes where around them captain the temsters were around them as the desperadoes were well armed so were the teamsters[.] they wanted to get some money out of the captain on some pretence of a pair of mules which the captain found and turned over to the railroad camp near to that place and the[y] thought the[y] could frighten the captain out of some money as they claimed the mules had been turned over to the wrong party. But the captain did not scare like they thought he would and when they saw the crowd around them with bussiness stamped on their faces[,] they concluded to let the captain go for the time being but they told us to our faces that they would either kill the captain or steal the cattle before we got to green river and at this the excitement ended for a time.

That night we camped on the river about one mile down the river. The next day being Sunday and also a very sick child which died that day belonging to Bro. Charles Draper the captain concluded to lay over and the child was buried in that place as above discribed[.] Bro. Draper buried two on those plains[.] as those desporadoes [desperados] had warned our captain so he took the warning and put a double guard night and day both over the cattle and camp as the cattle was always taken a distance away from the camp. and I was one to go out and herd that Sunday which was my first expeariance [.] we saw those men at a distance several times through the day but they gave us no trouble. But about sundown a bunch of cattle came over a pas[s] and run into some of ours and they got the spirit of it and away some few of ours with them. The other herders saw the dificulity as well as my self and some one had to go and try and keep tract and bring those cattle back so the other herders asked me if I would go. I consented to go and being very young and a good runner I was soon on their trail which was no trouble to follow. How far they ran I do not know, but I got around them as they were tired and had ran all they wanted. I gently drove them back. surely the lord answered my prayers as I ran after those cattle which were many. I prayed as I ran in my heart for I had no time to stop. The threats of those men rang in my hears for I knew well that if they were on the water[,] they could have very easily accomplished their threat. Why asistance did not come to me I did not know but they were sent[,] that is[,] the night hearders but I [they] could not find me, but I got the cattle back to the place where they started from. Then I met a man on horseback. I saw he was not one of our men and he had his hand on his gun or pistole. My hand was on mine, but I was glad that I had no use for it as it turned out to be one of the night herders of a other train which was no others than Bro. Robert McMicheal of Hoytsville after we for he helped me with the cattle had got stem them in a good place[,] he proferd to take care of them till I could go to Camp and send some one to take them to the herd and I was not long in getting to Camp[.] the Captain and temsters where still up[,] mighty glad to see me and receive the good news of the cattle being safe[.] it was not long till they got to the cattle and reported to the Captain back and I was thankful that I had been the means in the hands of God in doing so much good[.] I was very thankful for a nother thing I only had a Cap to wear and my skin on my face very tender and the sun very hot my face was very sore big scales on it[.] the next morning the captain gave a new Brode [broad] brimed hat[.] I had the respect of all after that[,] the Confidance of the captain and my fellow temsters and my journey to Utah was one that I look back and thank God I had the privilege of making with oxen teams.

Bishop Wm Sargant[,] His Father [John Sargent] & mother [Elizabeth Farrow Sargent] Brothers Nephi & Amos their sister Esther had a independent Wagon in the same train[.] there is one more insedant [incident] I must mention[.] after we had come through the Pass called Devils Gate we droped down a gentle slope to the sweet water [Sweetwater] where we found a man that had been killed by Indians[.] he was badly shot both with bullets and arrows. I helped to dig the poor fellows grave, roll him in his blankets and put him in and cover him up. We also had quite a number of our oxen die at a spring[.] I think it was the mud[.] We got through all right with Captain safe and cattle also.

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“Another Train In,” Deseret Evening News, 29 Aug. 1868, 3.

ANOTHER TRAIN IN.—Captain Seeley’s ox-train of 39 wagons got in this afternoon. He brought with him 272 passengers. The trip was made in four weeks, the train having left Laramie this day four weeks at 4 o’clock in the afternoon. There were four deaths during the trip, one of an aged person, and that of three children who died of measles.

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“Captain Seeley’s Train,” Deseret Evening News, 22 Aug. 1868, 3.

CAPTAIN SEELEY’S TRAIN.—By the kindness of B. Roberts, Esq., just arrived from Sweetwater, we learn that on Wednesday evening last, Bishop Seeley’s immigrant train was camped on the Sandy, nine miles east of Robinson’s ferry on Green River. They crossed the ferry next day, all well.

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“Died,” Deseret Evening News, 19 Aug. 1868, 2.

Died:
In Captain Seeley’s train, between Wagon Hound and Rock Creek, D. T., August 3, 1868, Sarah, wife of Bartel Turner, aged 63 years.

Deceased formerly belonged to Studham Branch, Bedfordshire Conference, England, and was with her husband and family on her way to Zion at the time of her death.

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“Immigration of 1868,” Semi-Weekly Telegraph, 28 Sep. 1868, 3.

FRIDAY EVENING, 25.
IMMIGRATION OF 1868.—The following is a summary of this season’s immigration across the plains, with the date of arrival of each train in this city, the captain’s names, number of passengers, wagons, &c., as reported:—

August 19th, J[ohn]. R. Murdock, 600 passengers, and 50 mule teams;

August 20th, J[oseph]. H. Rollins [Rawlins], 300 passengers, and 32 horse and mule teams;

Aug. 20th, Chester Loveland 293 passengers, and 40 teams;

Aug. 24th, Horton D. Haight, 275 passengers, and 46 ox teams;

August 29th, W[illiam]. S. Seeley, 272 passengers, and 39 teams,

September 2nd, D[aniel] McArthur, 405 passengers, and 61 teams;

Sept. 2nd, S[impson]. M. Molen, 300 passengers, and 61 ox teams;

Sept. 15th, J[ohn]. Gillespie, 500 passengers, and 50 ox teams;

Sept. 24th, E[dward]. S. Mumford, 250 passengers, and 28 mule teams; and

Sept. 25th, J[ohn]. G. Holman, 606 passengers, 62 teams, and 40 independent passengers with 8 teams.

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“Note of Thanks,” Deseret Evening News, 31 Aug. 1868, 3.

VOTE OF THANKS.—We have learned from some of the immigrants who arrived on Saturday, that at a meeting held after the train had camped in the kanyon [canyon] on the previous evening, a vote of thanks to Captain Seeley, his assistants and the teamsters, was proposed and unanimously carried, for their kind and gentlemanly course during the journey from Laramie: and that the warmest feelings were expressed and reciprocated on both sides. This is gratifying to all concerned. We also learned that a wish was expressed to have publicity given to the affair through the columns of the NEWS, which is now done.

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“Starting of Trains,” Deseret Evening News, 13 Aug. 1868, 3.

STARTING OF TRAINS.—The following trains started from Laramie City at the dates named, with immigrants: Captains Rawlins’ and Loveland’s trains left July 25th; Captain Murdock’s on the 27th, and Captain Haight’s on the 28th, with the passengers that came by the Minnesota and John Bright, 1,250 in number. Captain Seeley’s train left August 1st, with the Williamsburg passengers, and freight. The first of the trains may reach this city by Saturday or Sunday, though it is difficult to say exactly, since no information has reached yet of their striking the road where a telegraph station is; and the first they would come to, on the road they will most likely travel, would be at Bear River.

Since writing the above, the following telegram has been received from Captain Murdock:Fort Bridger, Aug. 13, 1868.

President B. Young:—My train is on the way in good condition. Be at Salt Lake the 20th.

J. R. MURDOCK.

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“The Emigration,” Deseret Evening News, 3 Aug. 1868, 2.

THE EMIGRATION.—By the kindness of Pres. Young we are able to lay before our readers the following items of news, received by telegram from Horace S. Eldredge, Esq.:”Laramie City, July 31, 1868.

“The Williamsburgh company arrived last night. Captain Seeley takes them to-day.””Laramie City, Aug. 1st, 1868.

“Rawlins and Loveland left [for home] the 25th; Murdock the 27th; Haight the 28th; Seeley to-day; Holman, Gillespie, Mumford, Molen and McArthur are waiting at Benton. I shall leave for Benton in a few days.”

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“The Immigration, Etc,” Semi-Weekly Telegraph, 6 Aug. 1868, 3.

MONDAY EVENING, 3.
THE IMMIGRATION, ETC.—We have been favored with a copy of the following telegrams to President B. Young:

Laramie City, Aug. 1.
Rollins and Loveland left on the 25th, Murdock the 27th, Haight the 28th, Seeley to-day. Holman, Gillespie, Mumford, Malin [Molen] and McArthur are waiting at Benton. I shall leave for Benton in a few days.

H. S. ELDREDGE.

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“The Immigration,” Deseret Evening News, 27 Aug. 1868, 3.

THE IMMIGRATION.—President Young has courteously favored us with the following telegrams, received by him to-day:

Fort Bridger, Aug. 27.
President B. Young:

My train passed here to-day. We are getting along finely.
D. D. MCARTHUR.

Echo City, Aug. 27.
President B. Young:

My train passed here at 9 a.m., all well. Will be in the city on Saturday.W. SEELEY.

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“The Immigration,” Semi-Weekly Telegraph, 31 Aug. 1868, 3.

THURSDAY EVENING, 27.
THE IMMIGRATION.—We have been favored with the following telegrams to President B. Young:

FORT BRIDGER, Aug. 27.
My train passed here to-day. Getting along finely.
D. D. MCARTHUR.
ECHO CITY, Aug 27.
My train passed here at nine o’clock, a.m. All well. Will be in the City on Saturday.
W. S. SEELY.

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“Come In,” Semi-Weekly Telegraph, 3 Sep. 1868, 3.

SATURDAY EVENING, 29.
COME IN.—Capt. W. S. Seeley’s ox train, consisting of thirty-nine teams, arrived this afternoon. Eleven contained freight for Messrs. Eldredge & Clawson. There were 272 passengers, mostly English. They started from Benton exactly four weeks since. Four deaths occurred—one elderly lady and three small children.

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“Immigration,” Semi-Weekly Telegraph, 27 Aug. 1868, 3.

MONDAY EVENING, 24.
IMMIGRATION.—We have been favored with the following telegram to President Young from Capt. W. L. Seeley’s train:

MUDDY, 8 MILES NORTH OF BRIDGER,
August 23, 1868.
We camped here last night. We leave here this evening. All well. Stock doing well.

PHILLIP HURST.

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Christensen, Maren Fredrikka Petterson, Autobiographical sketch, 3.

I soon received employment with an English family. In three months they left Chicago and we decided to go to Omaha were there were more Mormons, but alas many who had apostized from the church. At the Omaha Station we met three Elders from Utah who took us to a hotel for dinner after which they took us to the home of some Saints and asked us to remain one week after which arrangements had been made for us to go to Laramie free of charge with an English family. Laramie was half way across the plains to Utah and the end of the railroad. I had not the least idea of getting to Utah that same year. Without money or food we left with this family and we were overjoyed to be met by the Church wagons at Laramie with provisions, such as flour; pork, beans and beef. When an ox could be spared it was butchered and the greatest economy used in baking and cooking and rationing out. We were three weeks from Laramie to Utah by ox team, to carry our provisions, but we walked all the way and arrived in Salt Lake City and camped on the old tithing yard. Next morning the company broke up and each one driving to their different places where the teamsters belonged.
Trail Excerpt

RELATED COMPANIES
William S. Seeley Company (1868)
RELATED PERSONS
Maren Fredrikka Petterson
SOURCE LOCATIONS
Church History Library, Salt Lake City

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Deseret Evening News, 19 Aug. 1868, p. 2

BENTON, D. T., Aug. 6, 1868.

George Q. Cannon, Esq:—Dear Brother,—Enclosed I send list of Saints in my train which left Laramie on the 1st inst.

The health of the Saints is generally good, and they are all in good spirits in the expectation of soon reaching Utah; We have had one death which please insert a notice of.

With best respects to all,

I remain your brother in the gospel,
WM. S. SEELEY.Names of the Saints who left Laramie City, Aug. 1, 1868, in Capt W. S. Seeley’s train, for Salt Lake City.

Carl C. Asmussen; Eliza A. Adams; George Bishop and wife; Nicholas Batley; John [Mason] Burnside, wife and six children; John Burrill; Wm. [William] Coombe, wife, daughter; Theodore Curtis; Thos. [Thomas] Campbell, wife and three children; Charles Dummer and wife; Chas. [Charles]Dummer, Jr.; Wm. [William] Dummer, wife and four children; Chas. [Charles] Draper, wife and four children; Edmund Ellis, wife and three children; Wm. [William] Fawcett and wife; Robert Ford, wife and four children; Alex. [Alexander] Fife, wife and three children; John Fyfe, wife and three children; Matthew Frith; George Goble and wife; William Griffiths; Daniel Hall, wife and two children; James Hunter, wife and child; Richard Hunter, wife and one child; Andrew Hill, wife and two children; Robert Harker, wife and three children; Thos. [Thomas] Horne and wife; Thomas Johnson, wife and three children; Isaac Jones. wife and two children; Dav. A, [David Atherly] Kerr, wife and two children; John Larson; John Lunn, wife and five children; Leder [Ledru C.] Loveridge; Peter Lethbridge; Benj. [Behjamin] Laws, wife and two children; John Mead, wife and four children; James Montgomery; Thomas Morgan, wife and child, Elizabeth Nicholas; David Owens, wife and three children; Maria Pedersen; Marian Pedersen; Samuel Preston, wife and two children; William Pearson and wife; John Pembroke, wife and three children; Elizabeth Pearson; George Paramore and wife; Simon [Simeon] Pickering, wife and two children; Brown [Bower] Petit, wife and child; David Russell, wife and four children; Joseph Salisbury, wife and two children; James [W.] Stiff and wife; Henry Smith; Martin Sorensen; William Sorensen; Wm. [William] Smith, wife and five children; Samuel Stewart; James Stewart; William H. Scott and wife; Thomas Smithfield and wife; Thomas Scott; William Sargent, wife and child; John Sargent, wife and three children; John Skinner, wife and nine children; Bartil [Bartle] Turner, Senr. and wife; Bartil [Bartle] Turner junr; Joseph Turner and wife; Hugh [Williams] Thomas, wife and four children; John Teasdale, wife and two children; Thomas Tibble, wife and four children; William Joseph Underwood, wife and six children; James [Thomas] Underwood, wife and three children; G. H. [Gilbert Thomas] Van-Schoonover; Jesse Wright; Edward Wildman, wife and four children; Thomas Watkins, wife and daughter; Jane [Jane Caroline Pollard] Wiscombe and seven children; George [Alfred] Wiscombe, wife and two children; George Woodman, wife and two children.

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Haddock, Edith Parker and Dorothy Hardy Matthews, History of Bear Lake Pioneers [1968], 478-79.

On July 24, 1868, we started to Utah. We traveled by immigrant train for the first week, then we came to the terminal of the railroad where men from Utah were waiting with ox teams to take us across the plains.

We arrived in Utah in September, 1868. It took six weeks and three days to make the trip.

Our company consisted of covered wagons, each drawn by two yoke of oxen. Our captain was . . . [William S. Seeley] of Hyde Park, Utah. There were two families in our wagon. Most of the wagons carried two families.

The women and children rode and the men and boys walked or rode with the men who were hauling supplies for the company.

Father paid for our trip and our provisions before we started to cross the plains. We got our supplies as we needed them.

There was a herd of beef cattle along and they killed a beef twice a week and each family was given meat according to the size of their family. The women and children slept in the wagons and the men and boys had beds under the wagons. The men took turns herding the cattle and oxen at night. There was a captain over the whole company and then a captain over every fifty, then others over each ten men. Everyone knew his duties and worked unitedly with the others. There was never any trouble.

When we arrived in Salt Lake City, Utah, we rested for three days and then went on to Smithfield.

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Lyman, Albert Robison, An Appreciation and a Biographical Sketch of Benjamin Perkins, 1936, 5-7.

. . . first of August.

“As we traveled through the states people would come to meet us wherever we stopped, and they would try to persuade us not to come to Utah, telling us the people in Utah were a bad lot. I told them I was acquainted with quite a few of the people there, and I could not see how they could have gone from good to bad in such a short time, anyway I was going on and see for myself.

On the train we got acquainted with quite a number of Welch people, and some of them expressed their regrets that we were going to Utah to live among the terrible Mormons.

Before we got off the train we got a sight of the emigration teams waiting there for us. Four or five hundred people were gathered around the camp indulging in a rough and rather uncouth dance. There were no ladies participating, however; it was only a stag dance of the teamsters.

The language they used was very astonishing to us from the old country where we expected to find the people of Zion almost perfect. If such language had been used by the Church members in Wales, they would have been required to ask the pardon of the other members. But we soon became acquainted with their ways and shortly became one with them.

We started on West with the teams next morning, and traveled three days, going of necessity very slow because some of our members were still ill and others just recovering.

On the morning of the fourth day we met another party of teamsters going back after more emigrants, and their captain asked our captian for six volunteers to take the place of six of his men who had been drowned at Green River by a boat breaking loose.

I was one of the volunteers. The affection of my friends was certainly shown at this time—I was almost suffocated with farewell hugs and kisses.

I was given charge of a team but of course it was necessary for me to have some assistance as these were the first oxen I had ever seen worked. For sometime I couldn’t tell the oxen apart and often hitched up the wrong one.

A corral was made of the wagons to keep them in at night. It was a practice of mine to be among the first to hitch up, but as a rule I was among the last to leave as I so often had the wrong ox, and frequently had the off ox on the near side; very much to the disgust of the oxen and the teamsters.

When a teamster would miss his oxen, he would come and examine my outfit, and too often he would find there what he was looking for, and it became a byword among the crowd, “Look out for that d—–d Welchman.”

One morning as I was leaving with my six oxen they stopped me and took six out of my team, leaving me to go and find my own oxen.

The crownd was divided into parties of six, and as I was a new hand they were all willing to let me show how much I could do around a camp. As soon as the oxen were unyoked, my orders came thick and and fast from all sides. It was “Ben get some water,” “Ben, get some wood.” When it had gone on a week, I decided I had had enough of it. So after bringing in the wood, when the order came to get the water, I told them in my plainest English, for I was learning now to speak a little English, “Go to Hell!” The fellow jerked off his coat, and taking it as a warning I jerked off mine. He asked if I meant what I said and in my broken Welch and English I gave him to understand that I meant it all and more. After that I had considerable troulbe [trouble] with them and several times the boss threatened to show me my place.

Our next stop was at Echo Canyon, a Mormon camp on the railroad. Oh what a pleasant reunion! I had found a number of my boy friends from Wales. After giving them an account of my trip I had a hand full in keeping them from making a row over the way I had been treated, and the only way I could pacify them was by promising to stay there with them in the camp. So I stayed, but I had difficulty getting the boss of the teams to let me off.

When the boss found out that I wanted to earn money to send for my parents and the rest of the family in Wales, he gave me forty dollars with a “Bod bless you,” and he promised I would soon have the necessary money.”

This company from Laramie City to Echo Canyon was under the Direction of President William S. Seeley. There were thirty-nine wagons and 272 souls, though four of them died on the trip. . . .

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Simmons, Mary C., Autobiographical sketch, 1-2.

Written at the request of my children and others, May 1932.

Mary C[ulmer]. Simmons born January 21st 1863 of goodly parents, Frederick and Mary Kennett Culmer, in Bermondsey, Kent, England.

I can remember going with Mother at the age of five, to bid her parents goodby before imigrating to America in 1867. I remember my grand parents home in beautiful Kent, England. It was a thatched house with steep roof and sanded floor, so sweet and clean and smelling of raspberries, as we had some for dinner.

With my parents and brothers William [Harrison,] and Harry [Henry Adolphus Lavender,] and sister Nellie [Ellen Emily] we crossed the Atlantic Ocean in the sailing vessel “The Hudson”, embarking at Liverpool June 20th 1867. We were fifty-eight days crossing the Atlantic. I was a very delicate child and was laced in the berth most of the way to keep me from falling out, and to keep me dry for the old ship would rock so that the big air funnels, three or four feet across, would scoop up the water and flood the lower deck, where we were. It was a very old ship, this being the last trip it ever made. Father being a sailor, and my brothers were allowed to help in many ways, in this way helping to pay our passage.

My parents were advised to stay in Brooklyn for a year because it was unsafe to journey west at that time, as the Indians were on the war path through the Black Hills that year. My Father and brothers obtained work in Brooklyn

and the next year 1868 we started across the plains in Captain Seeley’s Company, journeying as far as Larimie Wyoming by train, this being the end of the railroad, most of the way in cattle cars, with just boards put across for seats, no back to lean against. I remember, as a child of six, how dreadfully the cars smelled.

Father had a sun stroke at Larimie, which was only a trading post at that tieme. While we were waiting for the wagon train to be made up, he was just taken in the shade of a high board fence to recover. I was very frightened.

Our train had two span of mules to each wagon. I remember a big herd of bison stampeding the mules of our train, also being attached [attacked] by the Indians with their faces all painted red and white, yelling and screaming as they rushed into our camp. The wagons were in a circle with the tongues in the center. I think the attack was made before the men were able to get the mules herded inside the circle, after taking them to water, as I know there was a terrible excitement. I recall the steep canyon roads both up and down, but down mostly, where the wagons would slide off the big rocks, much larger than the wagons, and fording streams so deep the mules and cattle would swim and the men made rafts to take the wagons across. At other times I remember seeing my Mother dragging through sand more than ankle deep, and again through rain and mud while hunting a place to camp. I am so glad there are moving pictures of all this, so true to what it was.

One of my clearest memories is when we arrived at Echo, in Echo Canyon, in the Rockies, there was a ranch house along the side of the road and Father bought a pound of fresh butter. I will never forget the smell and taste of that butter, perhaps the first taste of real fresh butter in my life, but the first of any kind for, no[w] a year, as we had always lived in a city where one buys butter from kegs.

Another memory is of a moonlight night when the camp was all settled and made safe, the people would gather around the campfire and after some prayer and singing, there would be dancing. Some would be mending clothes for the next day while others would be mending harnesses by the light of the camp-fire. The singing and joking was done mostly by the middle aged as both the young and the very aged were glad to rest.

We arrived in Salt Lake City, Utah in August 1868 and were met by my oldest brother, Alfred who arrived in Salt Lake in 1862, and my sister Esther and brother George F. who arrived in 1864; our parents having sent them on ahead to a great unknown country, preparatory to coming themselves with the remainder of the family. What a reunion! I wonder could we do the same?

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Street, Alexander, Journals and reminiscences, 1895–1898 and 1903, fd. 2, vol. 2, 11p.

We landed at Laremca [Laramie] the termanous [terminus] of the U.P.R.R. in the then teretory [territory] of Wyoming. Where Captain Lovelin of Brigham City was awaiting us with a mule train of I should think 55 or 60 wagons to take us on to Zion. We had singing & prayer in the morning and at night. We slept on the ground with the fermemment [firmament] for our tent the moon and stars for our light. The wagons at night would form a cicle [c]ircle corrall with a small opening at each end in this shape O the horses, mules or cattle would be drove in the corrall to catch them.

When we had got about 100 miles we met a train or oxen about the same nu[m]ber of oxen wagons[.] the captain’s name was [William S.] Seeley from Sanpete[.] in coming across Green River 5 of there te[a]msters had got drowned and they asked me to go and take one of the teams to drive[.] My parents consented and I was glad to go[.] I was then near 20 years of age, I must tell of a dream I had before we left England[.] in my dream I saw the wagons as plain as I saw them on the plains wich was a testemony to me. A[n]other dream I had that was fullfilled before we left in Part I thought I went to meeting as usually[.] I went the same path through the same door gate the same room[.] When I sat down I could see through the door into the bed room that some of the saints where holding a other meeting it was not many weeks till a Josephite Preacher came a long and convirted a number of our members and they began to hold meetings. I have seen quite a number apotitese [apostates] but I have got the First one to see that ever amounted to anything[.] they have a discontented spirit contenthus [contentious,] unhappy with a desire to make others as themselves[.] This is a great testimony to me when but a boy.

The first day after excepting the hosision [position] of a te[a]mster the boys c[o]upled 4 of the wagons to gether with 12 yoke of oxen to pull them[,] put a whip about 10 ft. Long with a handle 6 or 7 ft. into my hands and told me to drive them. I got a long farley Well[,] only I did not know what to say to the cattle and as each one had a name[.] 2 names was not learnt in a minute but I could hit them with the whip but after a while the stage came along and I got the Leaders out of the and was going nicely around the stage but as June soon as the Leaders got as far as was there costum [custom] they turned back into the road which pulled the Suting and Wheel Cattle into the stage[.] they all had a good laugh at me both captains teamsters and the people in and on the coach[.] the teamsters came to my aid and knowing what to say soon got the thing righted.

The next day they gave me 3 yoak of oxen and one wagon[.] they told me to say ge[e] when I wanted them to go to right ana [and] hagh [haw]. When I wanted them to go to the Left hand[.] they told me to call the oxen by share their separate names[.] I was a long time before I could call them by their proper names and many times I would say ge[e] when I ment haug, my gratest difficulity was when the oxen where brought into the corrall to be yoked up[,] the yoke was after this shape ‘m'[.] this is not a good one[.] the neck was in those loos the yoke on top of the neck a kee [key] through the loo on top of the yoke[.] the teamster would put the yoke on the left shoulder and would aproach the ox on the ox [h]is left side and with the loo[p] in the right hand would slip it under the neck and through the holls [holes] in the yoke and would then take the other and get the ox that worked on the other side. Those oxen got so used to it and to thier drivers that they could call the ox by name and he would come with out any firther trouble[.] being brought up to labor in the mines it was hard for me to learn[.] the trouble was I could not tell my oxen among so many about 360 besides a small band of young steers or cows to kill for meat by the way[.] my whip was a other difficulity[.] I was quite awhile before I could swing my whip and hit what and where I wanted to which was very neccessary to do in order to be a good and safe teamster[.] many a red mark I had on my face and neck from my hown [own] or Kwordness [awkwardness.] I would say not knowing how many times a nice sharp tap with the whip on the right side would bring the ox to the left hagh so suden that the front wheel on the off side of wagon would miss a rock[.] not only would this be neccessary to save the wheel but perhaps some very sick or dieng would be saved a severe shake when one died on those planes[.] they could not have a nice meeting house old Servises [services] in deviated to sute Shuck [such] an event[.] this would be held as before stated with the firmement as the tabernacle mostly in the shades of evening[.] it is then that the boxes that contain what few efects they had would be used[,] perhaps be rolled up in a blanket or quilt where the loved ones would stand and see the dirt put on them[,] weeping often till the train started next morning when they would bid farewell to father, mother brother or sister that lay under the little mound[.] no body knows only those that have passed through it what a sad Expearance some have passed through in order to keep the commandments of God[,] wich Sayes come out of your native land to the place I God have appointed[.] many a father mother brother sister Look back with their minds eye to that lonely spot wishing that body here in our lovely Simeparey [cemetery] to get there share of the decoration day of [w]reaths of flowers but they will have to wait till the resuraction [resurrection] day before they will see those bodies again for many of those mounds have become the same as the other service [surface] of the earth around[,] so that to find the place is next to impossible[.] We had our pleasures as well as sorrows when suitable dansing [dancing,] Singing[,] a Sermon on Sunday. Many a young man and maiden have met for the first time on those plains Sparked and then got married in the indulment [endowment] house when they got to Great Salt Lake as it was then called[.] I got so that I was delighted with that life on the planes[.] I had one more of difficulity on those planes which I would not mention but my history would lack that one to me very intresting part

when we got to the Plat[te] River close to what was known then as Fort Steel some desperadoes serounded our captain as he had gone about ½ a mile ahead of the train to examine the fort ford gust [just] at the edge of the river[.] they were in the willows but they did not have time to hurt him for the Chaplen [Chaplain] for some cause followed and when he saw the captains condition[,] the teamsters soon knew it and as the desperadoes where around them captain the temsters were around them as the desperadoes were well armed so were the teamsters[.] they wanted to get some money out of the captain on some pretence of a pair of mules which the captain found and turned over to the railroad camp near to that place and the[y] thought the[y] could frighten the captain out of some money as they claimed the mules had been turned over to the wrong party. But the captain did not scare like they thought he would and when they saw the crowd around them with bussiness stamped on their faces[,] they concluded to let the captain go for the time being but they told us to our faces that they would either kill the captain or steal the cattle before we got to green river and at this the excitement ended for a time.

That night we camped on the river about one mile down the river. The next day being Sunday and also a very sick child which died that day belonging to Bro. Charles Draper the captain concluded to lay over and the child was buried in that place as above discribed[.] Bro. Draper buried two on those plains[.] as those desporadoes [desperados] had warned our captain so he took the warning and put a double guard night and day both over the cattle and camp as the cattle was always taken a distance away from the camp. and I was one to go out and herd that Sunday which was my first expeariance [.] we saw those men at a distance several times through the day but they gave us no trouble. But about sundown a bunch of cattle came over a pas[s] and run into some of ours and they got the spirit of it and away some few of ours with them. The other herders saw the dificulity as well as my self and some one had to go and try and keep tract and bring those cattle back so the other herders asked me if I would go. I consented to go and being very young and a good runner I was soon on their trail which was no trouble to follow. How far they ran I do not know, but I got around them as they were tired and had ran all they wanted. I gently drove them back. surely the lord answered my prayers as I ran after those cattle which were many. I prayed as I ran in my heart for I had no time to stop. The threats of those men rang in my hears for I knew well that if they were on the water[,] they could have very easily accomplished their threat. Why asistance did not come to me I did not know but they were sent[,] that is[,] the night hearders but I [they] could not find me, but I got the cattle back to the place where they started from. Then I met a man on horseback. I saw he was not one of our men and he had his hand on his gun or pistole. My hand was on mine, but I was glad that I had no use for it as it turned out to be one of the night herders of a other train which was no others than Bro. Robert McMicheal of Hoytsville after we for he helped me with the cattle had got stem them in a good place[,] he proferd to take care of them till I could go to Camp and send some one to take them to the herd and I was not long in getting to Camp[.] the Captain and temsters where still up[,] mighty glad to see me and receive the good news of the cattle being safe[.] it was not long till they got to the cattle and reported to the Captain back and I was thankful that I had been the means in the hands of God in doing so much good[.] I was very thankful for a nother thing I only had a Cap to wear and my skin on my face very tender and the sun very hot my face was very sore big scales on it[.] the next morning the captain gave a new Brode [broad] brimed hat[.] I had the respect of all after that[,] the Confidance of the captain and my fellow temsters and my journey to Utah was one that I look back and thank God I had the privilege of making with oxen teams.

Bishop Wm Sargant[,] His Father [John Sargent] & mother [Elizabeth Farrow Sargent] Brothers Nephi & Amos their sister Esther had a independent Wagon in the same train[.] there is one more insedant [incident] I must mention[.] after we had come through the Pass called Devils Gate we droped down a gentle slope to the sweet water [Sweetwater] where we found a man that had been killed by Indians[.] he was badly shot both with bullets and arrows. I helped to dig the poor fellows grave, roll him in his blankets and put him in and cover him up. We also had quite a number of our oxen die at a spring[.] I think it was the mud[.] We got through all right with Captain safe and cattle also.

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From Mount Pleasant Pioneer Blog:

HOW MT. PLEASANT CELEBRATED ITS 50 YEAR ANNIVERSARY
MT. PLEASANT PIONEER MONUMENT
Did You Ever Wonder
How Mt. Pleasant Celebrated Its First 50 Years?

Well, for starters, they sent out a letter to each household with the following statement in the first paragraph, “The labor of opening up a new country amid the vicissitudes of pioneer life surely draws upon the admiration of everyone who appreciates integrity. The pioneers made habitable for us this uninviting land and laid the foundation for all the comforts that we enjoy; and that too, under conditions of extreme poverty and constant fear of attack from the Indians. These facts place us who enjoy the fruits of their labor, under a debt of gratitude to which all will acknowledge by taking a part in the erection of a suitable monument to their honor.”
The monument to which reference was made is the very one that stands in front of the Mt. Pleasant Carnegie Library today. The names inscribed on the base of the monument are the original heads of families who settled here in 1859. The money raised to erect the monument came from the families of those original pioneers. Each family was assessed $35.00 to have their pioneer ancestor included on the monument. That $35.00 sum in the year 1909 would be the equivalent of today’s $850.00, according to Consumer Price Index of 2009.
The names that follow are the names found on the base of the monument:
RIGHT PLATE
Wm. Seely
Neils P. Madsen
Rasmus Frandsen
M. C. Christensen
Nathan Staker
Jens C. Jensen
John Tidwell
Henry Wilcox
Peter Mogensen
John Carter
Orange Seely
George Coates
George Farnsworth
Jens Larsen
Peter Hansen
Svend Larsen
Rudolphus R. Bennett
Christian Brotherson
Daniel Page

Back Plate
Niels Widergreen Anderson
Andrew Madsen
Mads Madsen
Neils Madsen
Christian Madsen
John Meyrick
Jens Jorgensen
Jens Jensen
Peter Johansen
Neils Johansen
Justus Seely
James K. McClenahan
John Waldemar
Christian Hansen
Henry Ericksen
Andrew P. Oman
C.P. Anderson
Christian Jensen
James Harvey Tidwell
Martin Aldrich

Left Plate
Jefferson Tidwell
Paul Dehlin
Mortin Rasmussen
Hans C.H. Beck
Peter M. Peel
Erick Gunderson
Alma Zabriskie
Soren Jacob Hansen
John F. Fechser
Andrew P. Jensen
Wm. Morrison
Hans Y. Simpson
George Frandsen
Peter J. Jensen
Jacob Christensen
Frederick P. Neilson
John L. Ivie
Christian Neilson Christensen
Isaac Allred
Andrew Johansen
And the endeavor itself did not take years to complete. The proposal letter was sent out March 1st of 1909. The monument was in place and unveiled on July 5th, 1909, less than 6 months later. One can only imagine how long a similar endeavor would take today, not to mention the money that would need to be raised.

And what about the celebration itself? Who was there, who spoke at the unveiling of the statue? Joseph Fielding Smith, President of the Latter Day Saint Church, dedicated the monument. President Smith delivered an eloquent and impressive Dedicatory speech and prayer. President Smith began by saying “ it was rather out of his line to attempt to address on any subject except church work ; that to this discourse he would have to deal principally with the Church or he would not talk of the pioneers of Utah, but he did not wish any nonmember to take offense to his remarks or think that he considered no one else worthy of mention as he estimated all men by the lives they lived and their value as loyal, useful citizens”.
A three day celebration on the 5th 6th and 7th of July was held. According to the book of Mt.Pleasant, authored by Hilda Madsen Longsdorf. The following are excerpts from her book. The celebration was the greatest in the history of the town. People in the hundreds came from far and near. A non-resident described it as “ an unsurpassed success, without any unpleasant incident to mar the pleasure of the occasion under skies bright and blue – with stirring strains of music from martial and military bands, with salutes from canon and cracker; with eloquent oration and sweet singing, pleasing the large audiences; and to those inclined towards athletics, sports were provided daily”.

The monument was unveiled by Mrs. Sarah Borg, who was the second girl born in Mt. Pleasant. When the veil released by her from its fastenings, the flag with which the monument was covered, fluttered slowly to the ground, and amid the cheer of the vast crowd gathered, the beautiful shaft was revealed in all its splendor and glory; a splendid fitting tribute destined to stand throughout the years to come, to the work, trials and achievement of the Pioneers. A silent but emphatic testimonial of the great appreciation of the present generation for the mission so successfully performed by the brave men and women who settled Mt. Pleasant fifty years ago. (one hundred and fifty years ago in 2009).

This year, we the citizens of Mt. Pleasant have the opportunity to celebrate the founding of Mt. Pleasant with our own style and appreciation for those original brave pioneer families. On March 28th we hold our annual Pioneer Day, which is held at that time because it is significant to the fact that those original pioneers came north from Manti, Ephraim and Spring City in March of 1859 to once again try a new settlement, having been driven south a few years before by hostile indians. Because they recognized there was good ground here to raise crops, and good prospects to raise their families. We honor those families for their faith, courage and perseverance. We indeed owe them a great amount of gratitude whether we personally are a descendant or a newcomer, we reap the many abundant rewards of their unselfish labors.
Seely Family Photo (except W.S. Seeley):

Seely Photo

William S. Seeley Home:

Seeley HomeWilliam Stewart Seeley Home
Take notice of the hitchin’ post on the bottom left and the steps on the bottom right behind the fence. This photo could have been taken when Rasmus Anderson owned the home (second owner).

 

Friday, September 26, 2008

Pioneer of the Month – October

Bishop William Stewart Seely, the first Bishop of Mount Pleasant (Sanpete Stake), Sanpete County, Utah, was born May 18, 1812, in Pickering, Home District, Upper Canada, the son of Justus A. Seely and Mehittabel Bennett. Becoming a convert to “Mormonism” under the instruction of John Taylor, he was baptized in 1838 and migrated to Nauvoo, Hancock county, Illinois, where he resided until 1846, when he became an exile, like his co-religionists, and departed into the western wilderness. He came to Salt Lake Valley in 1847 and lived for some time in Salt Lake City and afterwards in Pleasant Grove, Utah county. When Mount Pleasant, Sanpete county, was re-settled in 1859 he became one of the founders of that place, where he spent the remainder of his years and where he was active in everything pertaining to the growth and welfare of that commonwealth. When Mount Pleasant became an incorporated city, William S. Seely was elected its first mayor, and he acted as Bishop of Mount Pleasant about thirty years. He took part in all the military movements during the Black Hawk war and also filled two missions to Canada, one in 1873 and the other in 1878. In 1868 he went as captain of a Church train as far east as Laramie after immigrants. Bishop Seely married three wives, two of whom survived him. His first wife was Elizabeth De Hart, who died April 6, 1873, after bearing her husband several children, of whom Elizabeth, Emily, Moroni, Emmeline, Joseph N. and Lucinda were still living in 1898. His second wife was Ellen Jackson, whose children are Justice L. and William S. The Bishop’s third wife was Ann Watkins and her children are William A. and Anna R. Bishop Seely was not only a prominent citizen in local affairs, but was well and favorably known throughout the Territory of Jenson, Andrew. LDS Biographical Encyclopedia: A Compilation of Biographical Sketches of Prominent Men and Women in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Salt Lake City, UT: Andrew Jenson History Co., 1901. Utah. He died at Mount Pleasant, Sept. 17, 1896.

In August 1885, William S. married his fourth wife, Susanne Foster. They did not have any children.

Ellen Jackson Seely, Second wife of William S., died on January 17, 1908. She was 89 years old.

Ann Watkins Seely, third wife of William S., died April 18, 1927. She was 81 years old, and was buried in the Mt. Pleasant Cemetery.

Final Peace Treaty. Several peace conferences with the Indians had been held in different settlements. A meeting was held at Mt. Pleasant, September 17, 1872, at which General Morrow, Apostle Orson Hyde, Bishop Amasa Tucker, Bishop Fredrick Olson, Bishop W. S. Seely, Colonel Reddick Allred met at Mt. Pleasant with a great number of Indian Chiefs and braves, among whom were Tabiona, White Hare, Angizeble and others who were known to have encouraged depredations under Chief Black Hawk. The concluding peace treaty was signed at this time. That meeting was held at the home of William S. Seely. (the current Mt. Pleasant Relic Home) also see: http://www.lds.org/churchhistory/library/source/0,18016,4976-5975,00.html

Thursday, September 4, 2008

Pioneer of the Month – September — Jacob Christensen (see halfway through entry to see mention of W.S. Seeley)

Biographical Sketch of Jacob Christensen (excerpts)

Jacob Christensen, son of Christen Petersen and Maren Thompsen, eldest of ten children, was born in Vennsyssel, Hjoring, Denmark, September 21, 1827. His father was the son of Peter Peterson and Mette Christensen. His father, Christen Peterson was born in Lendum, Jutland, Denmark and his mother Maren Thomsen was born in Napstyert, Jutland Denmark.

His boyhood days were typical of the times in which he lived. His parents earned their scanty living by fishing. When a young man he spent two years in the service of his king, as was customary. He served as a sailor.

Jacob joined the L.D.S. church in his native land on February 20, 1853 and was a traveling elder for the following two years. He married Inger Kristine Thomsen January 19, 1855. She became the mother of nine children, the eldest being born in Denmark before immigration.

In 1857 they immigrated to the United States. a perpetual emigration fund came into being through the desires of the church leaders to bring to this land those too poor to provide themselves with the transportation money which was needed.

Jacob’s mother accompanied them to Omaha, Nebraska, where she died a short time later. They were compelled to stay here for two years, because of lack of funds to go further. Here, although he took whatever employment he could get at sawmills and adobe yards, they lived under the most trying circumstances. One time he was obliged to trade one shirt, of his meager supply of two, for a bushel of frozen turnips, which they boiled and then warmed up in tallow. While crossing the plains Jacob and his good wife encountered a great misfortune. Their only child died.

They located in Mt. Pleasant, among the first settlers in the fall of 1859, living in a dugout until the fort was built. Jacob helped to build the south wall of the fort, furnishing team, wagon and his own work. Homes were built against the inside walls of the fort where the settlers lived. By the fall of 1859 Mt. Pleasant had a population of 800 people.

The First Ward was organized at Mt. Pleasant, July 9, 1859, by Elders George A. Smith and Amasa M. Lyman. William S. Seely was ordained bishop. Jacob Christensen became his first counselor. The Bishop and his counselors were looked upon as the leaders of the group. They were the superintendents, planners, confidant tribunal, directors, ecclesiastical tribunal, the leaders of the group, in fact the responsibility of the settlement rested upon their shoulders.

They were all busy people those days, building homes, a fort, clearing and plowing land, planting crops, building fences, canals, fighting and guarding against Indians, harvesting crops and a score of other jobs.

Thereafter, Jacob devoted much of his time to building up of this community. He was a shareholder in Mt. Pleasant’s first cooperative institution and organizer of the United Order here. He served as Counselor to Bishop William S. Seely for seven years and as president of the High Priest’s quorum for twenty five years.

January 14, 1865, he married Ingeborg Anderson, daughter of Christian and Karen Anderson. Ingeborg was the only daughter and the youngest of a family of four, born in Seiland, Denmark, April 28, 1846. Her father was a tailor, and Ingeborg had a comfortable childhood attending the schools of the town until her parents accepted the Latter-day Saint Church and decided to leave their homeland for Utah, where her three brothers had already settled. This was in 1862.

Plurality of wives was in flower at that time. Those who could afford two families and were worthy could get permission of the Church authorities to marry a second wife. Jacob asked Ingeborg to marry him, and after due consideration she accepted his offer of marriage. The were married, January 1865. She was 19 years of age and he was double her age, but it seems at that time, this was often the case. Ingeborg became the mother of seven children, two dying in infancy.

About this time Jacob took a very active part in the Black Hawk War, being captain of Company A, Mt. Pleasant Militia and was in several engagements with the Indians. He was also a Councilman in Mt. Pleasant’s first city council.

On March 15, 1869, he married his third wife, Anna Christena Marberg, daughter of Johannes and Christine Peterson Marberg, who was born March 2, 1850 at Leitse, Gutland, Sweden. She was the second child in a family of four daughters.

They were married in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. Their first home was the Haage home about 411 South State Street, Mt. Pleasant (now vacant). This house, built by Jacob Christensen was considered one of the finest residences of the early days.

Anna became the mother of ten children, three dying in infancy, one in youth and two in middle life.

Jacob died March 9, 1915, having been an invalid for eleven years.

Mt Pleasant Mayor of the Month

 

http://mtpleasantmayor.blogspot.com/

 

William Stewart Seely

 

William Stewart Seeley, son of Justus Azel and Mahitable Bennet Seeley, was born in Pickering, Home District, Upper Canada (now Ontario) on May 18, 1812. It was here that he and his wife Elizabeth DeHart first heard the Restored Gospel taught by John Taylor and were baptized in the year 1837.

 

Shortly after their baptism, the desire to join the body of the church took them to Missiouri. They were driven out and moved to Nashville, Iowa for several years and enjoyed comparative peace until after the prophet’s martyrdom.

 

Persecution broke out anew and forced them from their homes in Nashville. They traveled west to Council Bluffs where they spent the winter of 1846-47. On June 14, 1847 they started west. They arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on September 29 or 30, 1847.

 

They moved into the North For and began to cut timber and build a home, then responded to President Brigham Young’s request for families to settle farther south. First they settled in Pleasant Grove building homes and raising cattle and sheep. With grazing quarters restricted, they decided to go farther south to Sanpete in 1859. They built crude homes on the banks of Pleasant Creek, but Indian raids became apparent, and they sought protection by building a fort. William Seeley directed this work.

 

William Seeley was chosen as the first bishop of the Mt. Pleasant Ward on July 9, 1859 and held this office for thirty years. Bishop Seeley was exceptionally successful in his dealings with the Indians.

 

He served two years in the Territorial Legislature. Mt. Pleasant was incorporated as a city on February 20, 1868, and William Seeley was elected mayor on May 5. He served from 1868-69, 1879-80, 1881-82 and 1883-84.

 

He erected the first sawmill in Twin Creek Canyon. He built a home outside the fort in 1861. His home was between 1st and 2nd south on State Street (now the Relic Hall).

 

On April 1, 1857 he married his second wife, Ellen Jackson, and they had two children. Later he married Anne Watkins with whom he also had two children. His first wife, Elizabeth DeHart, was the mother of nine children.

 

Elizabeth died in 1875. Shortly after, he filled two missions to Canada. He died on September 18, 1896.

William Stewart Seeley Miscellneous

R. Douglas Brackenridge:
“In an unsolicited courtesy, Bishop W. S. Seeley invited [Duncan James] McMillan to speak at several Mormon Sunday evening meetings and even placed the meetinghouse at his disposal for Protestant services. Mormons listened politely to his sermons, which were brief, nonpolemical homilies on basic Christian doctrines. “Even the Bishop,” McMillan acknolwedged, “thanked me for the sermon.” (Duncan J. McMillan, “Pulpit and Revolver,” Salt Lake Tribune, 22 June 1879, 4).”
– “Are You that D* Presbyterian Devil?” The Evolution of an Anti-Mormon Story, Journal of Mormon History, p. 84

The Deseret Weekly

23 September 1895

OBITUARY NOTES.

ANNA MARIA ВАВШ YOUNG.

Died of rheumatism and general de bllity, at 1.30 a. m. Wednesday, September 23rd, 1895, Anna Maria Sabin, wile of Franklin W. Young, born July 19th, 1846. At tbe time of her last Illness and death she was on a visit to her son, Le Roy, at Mesa, in Wayne county, where everything that loving hearts or willing bands could do was done for her. Tbe remains were conveyed home and the funeral held in Fremont at 1 p. m., sieptember 20th. ähe was buried by tbe wde of ber little son David, the first inbite person known to have been buriec h Wayne county. She leaves a loving Susband, two eons and four daughters, and a host of friends to mourn her loss,

The Deseret News Weekly, volume 51, pg.512

The Deseret News Weekly, volume 51, pg.512

WILLIAM STEWART SEELY.

Mr. Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Sept. 23 1895.—Death has again viaited our qule

burg this tim« taking away one ol our oldest and most respected citizens, ez3ishop Wm. Stewart Seely. After a »rostrated illness of many months, deatb tame to his release on Monday, Sep’.etnjer 16th. His funeral services were held n the tabernacle on Thursday, the 19th, where a host of friends and relatives met to do honor to him. The speakers on tbe occasion were Elders Heal, of the Stake presidency; Farnsworth, ot the tfanti Temple; R. Lewellyn, oí Fountain Green, and of Mt. Pleasant, Ed Cliff; Peter Mogensen, Jacob Christensen, exEiisbop Madsen, Bishop Lund and others. I’he deceased was known by tbespeakers ranging from 15 to 30 years and it seemed thai their hearts were filled with love and veneration for and fond and pleasant memories of the venerable old man.

William Stewan Seeley was born May 18, 1812, in Pickering, Home District, Canada. He spent bisearly life as a saior and sea captain on Lake Ontario, where it seemed the Gospel found him, and on August 28, 1838, he started for Missouri to join tbe Saints and shared all their pereecutlons,mobbing8 and driving after that date, till he started for Utah in the fall of 1847, where he arrived September 29. In; 1851 (he moved to Mount Pleasant, Sanpete county; married Elizabeth D. Heart Nov. 25, 1868. In 1859 he was ordained a Bishop under the hands of George A. Smith. From the da’.e of his arrival in Mount Pleasant he was a potent laetor in settling differences between whites and Indians, being particularly gifted in winning the red mau’s affection. He figured conspicuously in the Walker and Black hawk wars and would spend weeks among the red men, talking peace to them. Nor was he wanting In liberality towards the aborigines; many are the gits which he showered upon them and they always found a resting place at hie home. He was a member of tbe party of teamsters who went back to bring emigrants, ;May, 1868, which event was made memorable by the drowniag of nine of their number in Green river. He filled the office of mayor of Mt. Pleasant city nine years. Twice did he visit the laud of his nativity as a bumble bearer of the Gospel message; and was honorably releaeed from beingBishop, May 18th, 1890, because of infirmity, since which time he has been more or less confined to his room, and on the Kith inat his spirit took its flight, which closed a long, busy and useful life.

Too much good cannot be said of such a useful spirit. He came here in the vigor of youth, as It were, spent his strength and power building forts and cities, making roads and bridges, warding the red men off, risking his life to sue for peace, undergoing privation and hunger occasioned by gra-shoppers and cricke 8, giving the best of his oran hood to build a solid commonwealth, and laiily bequea’hed it to the coming generation. The noblest heritage he could give —would (hat they be as worthy as the giver, and that they deliver it up to the generation to come as unsullied aa they receive it. Cisco.

THE DEAD.

Peaceful be their Rest.

Кi,\itkn.- In Una city, Sept. 25, of consumption, Clarence G. Kutten.

Williams.—In this city, on September 21. of typhoid fever, Ann Louise, the wife of Henry L. Williams; aged 51 years and 7 month».

Evekill.—In the Becond wird of this city of typhoid pneumonia, .lohn Joseph, son of John and Ruth Kverill.aged 20 years. 8 months and U day*.

http://books.google.com/books?id=_mbUAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA512&dq=William+Stewart+seely&hl=en&ei=PMpNTKmUA4-esQO4mPVI&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCoQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=William%20Stewart%20seely&f=false

CHIEF TABBY SENDS WORD HE CAN NO LONGER CONTROL HIS INDIANS.
On the 12th of August General D. H. Wells received the following message from Colonel E. N. Allred of Spring City:
“Tabby sends word to all the Bishops, that he can control his men no longer.
‘ ‘ He was in Spanish Fork Canyon yesterday. I with a detachment brought the herd from Thistle Valley yesterday, having started as soon as I got word of the raid at Fairview. The wounded boy Stewart is dead.”
Next dav R. L. Johnson of Fountain Green, telegraphed to Indian Agent Dodge for troops to defend the people against some of the bands of savages who had become incensed on account of obedience to Dodge’s orders not to feed them as he would furnish them plenty on the reservations.
COL. IVIE SENDS DISPATCH TO GEN. WELLS.

Colonel John L. Ivie of Mount Pleasant sent the following dispatch:
Mount Pleasant, Aug. 17, 1872, Gov. Geo. L. Woods, care of Daniel H. Wells Indian depredations here last night. Shall I call out the militia to defend the place for services generally in this county? The Indians attacked the telegraph operator about 11 o’clock last night in front of the office and, we fear, fatally wounded him.
John L. Ivie, Colonel of Militia

Also the following was sent:

ASSAULT UPON JEREMIAH D. PAGE

Mount Pleasant, Aug. 17th. Gen. D. H. Wells As the telegraph operator, Jeremiah D. Page, was leaving the office last night about 11 o’clock, and when near the gate by the office, an Indian pounced upon his back and struck him three blows, with a tomahawk, upon the head, inflicting severe wounds, one penetrating through the skull. He was in a critical condition all night, but seems a little better this morning. There were five Indians seen in town about the same time that the attack was made upon Mr. Page. Col. J. L. Ivie detailed a scouting party from the home guard this morning, and they were scouting the base of the east mountain.
One scout reports no sign of Indians in that direction,
J. S. Wing.

INFORMATION ON ASSAULT, BY BISHOP SEELY.
Under date of Aug. 20, 1872, Bishop Win. Seely, of Mt. Pleasant writes to the Deseret News the following:

On Saturday evening suspicion rested on Richard Smyth as being the person who assailed our operator on the 16th. He was arrested, but on account of unavoidable circumstances, was held over until today at ten o’clock. An investigation took place, and when the prisoner was asked if he were guilty, or not guilty, he pleaded guilty of committing the horrible deed, after which he was committed to a higher court. The operator said that he was telegraphing a message to the operators of the county, and while so doing observed Smyth go into an adjoining room, and return and place himself behind him. He stood for about a half an hour, and as quick as the operator had finished the message and closed the key he was struck down and knew no more until he found himself lying on a lounge in the above named adjoining room with his head all mangled and his clothing all soaked in blood, and Richard Smyth pacing to and fro with a hatchet in his hand. The latter continued to walk back and forth along side of the lounge, making remarks about the deed he had done. After making a pause for some duration, he said, Jeremiah, hold up your hands, I cannot spare your life any longer, your head is all chopped into pieces and your brains are running out. I have murdered you. The operator says he resolved in his mind, weak as he was, if a chance offered itself, to spring upon Smyth, take the hatchet and kill him, but there was no chance, so he thought again the best way was to direct his mind upon the best means of liberating himself and cover up the deed; so from that Smyth made him swear not to reveal what had happened for six months, and still kept him there for about five hours ; without any assistance, soaked in his blood and perishing with cold. He was so weak and frightened that he dared not reveal anything after he got among his friends until Smyth had confessed he did the deed, when the operator made the above statement.
Signed W. S. Seely.

No justifiable reason for the assault on Page by Smyth can be ascertained, Smyth, it appears, was subject to fits of insanity, and was probably laboring partially under an attack of insanity, when he committed the assault.

The following is added by the historian Peter Gottfredson :

“The office in which Jeremiah Page was assailed by Richard Smyth was under the supervision of Anthon H. Lund. Besides the telegraph office Brother Lund also kept a daguerrotype picture gallery in an adjoining room. It was quite customary for young people to meet and visit there. Brother Page was well thought of and a favorite with the young people, but not so much with Smyth, and it was the general supposition that Smyth was jealous of Page and that this had much to do with the act. I was a resident of Mount Pleasant at that time and well acquainted with all parties concerned. Page was learning telegraphy under Brother Lund and was night operator.”

PETER GOTTFREDSON, Utah Indian War Veterans, Indian Depredations, pg. 297-300

William Stewart Seeley and Ann Watkins photograph

William Stewart Seeley and Ann Watkins photograph

 

Portrait of Ann Watkins and William Stewart Seeley. Original is at the Relic Home Museum at Mt. Pleasant, Utah.

Portrait of Ann Watkins and William Stewart Seeley. Original is at the Relic Home Museum at Mt. Pleasant, Utah.

Brief mentions of William Stewart Seeley in the Mount Pleasant book:

IMG_6493

IMG_6492

 

Other images relating to William Stewart Seeley (unless specified, the sources of these images may be unknown):

Merz

 

From Findagrave.com:

Birth: May 18, 1812
Death: Sep. 16, 1895

Family links:
Spouses:
Elizabeth Dehart Seely (1815 – 1873)
Ellen Jackson Carter Seely (1815 – 1908)*

Children:
Emily Seely Averett (1845 – 1924)*
Moroni Seely (1848 – 1930)*
William Stewart Seely (1858 – 1923)*
William Alfred Seely (1875 – 1933)*

*Calculated relationship

William Stewart Seeley GraveBurial:
Mount Pleasant City Cemetery
Mount Pleasant
Sanpete County
Utah, USA
Plot: A_ms_106_5

Maintained by: Penne Magnusson Cartrigh…
Originally Created by: Utah State Historical So…
Record added: Feb 02, 2000
Find A Grave Memorial# 139912Seeley grave 2

 

 

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=139912

Seeley grave 3

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